Andromache


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An·drom·a·che

 (ăn-drŏm′ə-kē)
n. Greek Mythology
The wife of Hector, captured by the Greeks at the fall of Troy.

Andromache

(ænˈdrɒməkɪ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the wife of Hector

An•drom•a•che

(ænˈdrɒm əˌki)

n.
the wife of Hector.
Translations

Andromache

[ænˈdrɒməkɪ] NAndrómaca

Andromache

[ænˈdrɒməkɪ] nAndromaca
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Hesiod has nothing that remotely approaches such scenes as that between Priam and Achilles, or the pathos of Andromache's preparations for Hector's return, even as he was falling before the walls of Troy; but in matters that come within the range or ordinary experience, he rarely fails to rise to the appropriate level.
He did not find Andromache, for she was on the wall with her child and one of her maids, weeping bitterly.
When he had gone through the city and had reached the Scaean gates through which he would go out on to the plain, his wife came running towards him, Andromache, daughter of great Eetion who ruled in Thebe under the wooded slopes of Mt.
It argues a certain hardness, or at any rate dislike of the "Iliad" on the part of the writer of the "Odyssey," that she should have adopted Hector's farewell to Andromache here, as elsewhere in the poem, for a scene of such inferior pathos.
The actress said: "Andromache is married to Hector, who is the son of Priam and Hecuba and heir to the throne of Troy.
Andromache dropped the infant Astyanax from the tower of Troy in an act of mercy, to spare her and Hector's newborn from the brutalities and horrors of war.
And Andromache saw him [her husband Hector] while his body was being dragged in front of the city.
430 BC) (71-82); Hippolytus (428 BC) (83-102); Andromache (ca.
(61) In reference to women status, Rose has put it that the Iliad shows far more sympathy for women like Helen, Andromache, and Briseis, for example, that the fear and ambivalence characterizing the Odyssey (CAG, p.
In his tragedy, Euripides portrays the story of Neoptolemus, who marries Andromache right after the fall of Troy.
It exhibits order in and among all its parts, each reflecting and deepening the other, so that we cannot think of Achilles and his ambiguous devotion to glory without thinking of Hector and his more grudging choice of glory over the sweetness of the family life and civic life he so deeply loves; nor can we think of Helen and her dangerous charms without thinking of the artless Andromache; or the stubborn sulking of Achilles without thinking of his longing for the homeland and the father he knows he will never see again.
So her "Family Jewels" (July 1874) traced the versions of various legendary figures from classical antiquity through the works of Dante, Ariosto, Spenser, Tasso, Calderon, Chaucer, and Goethe; her "Andromache: The Daughters of Priam" (March 1875) covered the post-Homeric renderings of Andromache by Euripides and Racine; "The Phoenissae of France, Italy, and Germany" (November 1878) tracked the rivalry of Oedipus's sons through plays by Euripides, Racine, Schiller, and Alfieri.