Andromache


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An·drom·a·che

 (ăn-drŏm′ə-kē)
n. Greek Mythology
The wife of Hector, captured by the Greeks at the fall of Troy.

Andromache

(ænˈdrɒməkɪ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the wife of Hector

An•drom•a•che

(ænˈdrɒm əˌki)

n.
the wife of Hector.
Translations

Andromache

[ænˈdrɒməkɪ] NAndrómaca

Andromache

[ænˈdrɒməkɪ] nAndromaca
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Seeing, then, that she was not within, he stood on the threshold of the women's rooms and said, "Women, tell me, and tell me true, where did Andromache go when she left the house?
Hector smiled as he looked upon the boy, but he did not speak, and Andromache stood by him weeping and taking his hand in her own.
It argues a certain hardness, or at any rate dislike of the "Iliad" on the part of the writer of the "Odyssey," that she should have adopted Hector's farewell to Andromache here, as elsewhere in the poem, for a scene of such inferior pathos.
Meanwhile, Andromache receives both good and bad news and a bitter dispute erupts between Agamemnon and Achilles.
Now the actress from Stockbridge locks horns as Andromache, wife of Hector in a lavish retelling of one of history's most famous moments, the fall of Troy.
In this changgeuk, foreign names such as Hecuba, Cassandra and Andromache are sung through pansori and yet they go well with each other.
An educational intervention was designed based on the Andromache model for teaching innovation in taking these cytology tests, registered in the National Copyright Institute, dependent on the Mexican Secretary of Public Education (INDAUTOR, registry number: 032014-020412513001-01), and which was designed by researchers in the Faculty of Nursing at Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Mexico.
Andromache dropped the infant Astyanax from the tower of Troy in an act of mercy, to spare her and Hector's newborn from the brutalities and horrors of war.
And Andromache saw him [her husband Hector] while his body was being dragged in front of the city.
430 BC) (71-82); Hippolytus (428 BC) (83-102); Andromache (ca.
61) In reference to women status, Rose has put it that the Iliad shows far more sympathy for women like Helen, Andromache, and Briseis, for example, that the fear and ambivalence characterizing the Odyssey (CAG, p.
In his tragedy, Euripides portrays the story of Neoptolemus, who marries Andromache right after the fall of Troy.