angel shark

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angel shark

n.
Any of several raylike sharks of the genus Squatina, having a flattened body and winglike pectoral and pelvic fins.

angel shark

or

angelfish

n
(Animals) any of several sharks constituting the family Squatinidae, such as Squatina squatina, that have very large flattened pectoral fins and occur in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Also called: monkfish
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.angel shark - sharks with broad flat bodies and winglike pectoral fins but that swim the way sharks doangel shark - sharks with broad flat bodies and winglike pectoral fins but that swim the way sharks do
shark - any of numerous elongate mostly marine carnivorous fishes with heterocercal caudal fins and tough skin covered with small toothlike scales
genus Squatina, Squatina - type genus of the Squatinidae: angel sharks
Translations

angel shark

angel fish nsquadro
References in periodicals archive ?
The whale sharks, angel sharks and common guitarfish in the Mediterranean were listed under Appendix I, while the dusky angel and blue sharks, white-spotted wedgefish and common guitarfish were listed under Appendix II.
Though very rarely spotted in the UK, angel sharks can be found in the Celtic Sea.
In this study, 11 angel sharks were equipped with ultrasonic telemetry transmitters attached with "Floy" dart tags on the dorsal surface of the sharks.
Initially restricted to coastal areas and continental shelf fishing grounds, bottom gillnet fisheries developed in southeastern and southern (SE/S) Brazil focusing primarily on demersal fishes as angel sharks (Squatina spp.
I saw so many different fish including angel sharks, big groupers, octopuses and millions of damsel fish.
Angel sharks are critically endangered and were declared officially extinct in the North Sea in 2006.
5million-litre display, which is one of the largest in Britain, is also home to hundreds of species, including three-metre long sand tiger sharks, stingrays and angel sharks.
But angel sharks (family Squatinidae) have proportionately larger jaws than any other species.
A telemetric study of the behavior of free swimming Pacific angel sharks Squatina californica.
A coalition of park advocates, including NPCA, believes that the reserve area will help reverse an alarming decline in populations of several marine species once plentiful there, including red snapper, abalone, and angel sharks.