dong quai

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dong quai

 (do͝ong kwā, kwī)
n.
A perennial aromatic herb (Angelica sinensis) in the parsley family, native to China and Japan, yielding a root that is used medicinally for gynecological disorders such as premenstrual syndrome, menstrual cramps, and menopausal symptoms.

[Mandarin dāng guī, from Middle Chinese taŋ kyj : taŋ, should, ought + kyj, return (from the belief that the plant causes blood to return where it should).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A randomized, double-blind, placebo- controlled study on the anti-haemostatic effects of Curcuma longa, Angelica sinensis and Panax ginseng.
oil having a cannabinoid content of at least 10%; Angelica sinensis extract; Croton lechleri resin; Astragalus membranaceous root extract; and emulsifier, cosmetic fillers, building agents, preservatives, or moisturizing agent selected from the group consisting of candellia/jojoba/rice bran polyclyceryl-3-ester; glyceryl stearate; cetearyl alcohol; sodium stearoyl lactylate; sodium hyaluronate; glycerin; cetyl hydroxyethylcellulose; xanthan gum; caprylyl alcohol; potassium sorbate; and tocopherol; and an effective amount of sodium hydroxide present to increase the pH level in the overall composition and to prevent the dragon's blood resin from turning a shade of pink.
Here, by the in vivo model of D-gal-induced aging mice, we found that ASP, a major active ingredient in Angelica Sinensis, exerts profound antiaging effect on [Sca-1.sup.+] HSC/HPCs.
Shang, "Isolation, structure and bioactivities of the polysaccharides from Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels: a review," Carbohydrate Polymers, vol.
To assess the potential effects of RPCHMs, we identified eight CHMs reimbursed by the NHI Bureau that have been shown to have beneficial effects on renal function in clinical and animal studies, namely Cordyceps sinensis, da huang (Rheum palmatum L.), Astragalus membranaceus, dan shen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge.), Angelica sinensis, Saireito (Chai-Ling-Tang, a mixture herbal formulation) [18,19], Yishen capsule (an encapsulated herbal formulation) [20], and WenPi Tang (a mixture herbal formulation) [21].
The root of Angelica sinensis (Chinese named Danggui), a well-known herbal medicine, has been historically used as a tranquilizer or a tonic agent [8, 9].
Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (family Apiaceae) is a perennial herb that has been widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine.
Tuo-Li-Xiao-Du-San (TLXDS) is a refined Chinese medicine formula consisting of four herbs: Danggui (Radix Angelica sinensis), Huangqi (Radix Astragali), Baizhi (Angelica dahurica), and Zaojiaoci (thorns of Gleditsia sinensis), in the ratio of 5:5:4:4 (15g for the former two and 12g for the latter two).
Angelica Sinensis Radix (roots of Angelica sinensis', ASR) is a popular herbal supplement in China for promoting blood circulation.
Ligustilide (from Uterine muscle from female (2006) [62] Angelica sinensis) Wistar rats (180-200 g) and female ICR mice (20-24 g) Hua et al.
Hsiao, and two qian (~7.5g) of Angelica Sinensis Radix (ASR), roots of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels.
Hsiao, and two qian of Angelicae Sinensis Radix (ASR), roots of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels.