Angeleno

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Related to Angelinos: Los angelenos

An·ge·le·no

 (ăn′jə-lē′nō)
n. pl. An·ge·le·nos
A native or inhabitant of Los Angeles.

[American Spanish Angeleño, after Los Angeles.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Angeleno

(ˌændʒəˈliːnəʊ)
n, pl -nos
(Placename) a native or inhabitant of Los Angeles
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

An•ge•le•no

(ˌæn dʒəˈli noʊ)

n., pl. -nos.
Also called Los Angeleno. a native or resident of Los Angeles.
[1885–90; < American Spanish angeleño]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

Angeleno

[ˌændʒəˈliːnəʊ] Nhabitante mf de Los Angeles
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Angeleno

nEinwohner(in) m(f)von Los Angeles
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
WHAT: 1,400 Angelinos sought out "The Good Body" on Feb.
The program gives more Angelinos an opportunity to live in a decent home at no additional cost to the city, said foundation President Stacey Davis Stewart in presenting the $100,000 prize.
Angelinos who turn in their old mowers will get a $300 credit toward the purchase of a new $400 electric mower.
Birmingham will never achieve its full potential, nor will Brummies be able to stand next to New Yorkers, Los Angelinos, Londoners or Parisians, until enough of its own kind, its native children really have no doubt in their mind that this city is the best, that there is no other city that can out do it.
One kind of fault line--poverty--rocks tens of thousands of very poor Angelinos every day.
Jake Gittes (Nicholson), whose bread and butter work is in divorce court, finds himself sucked into a serpentine plot to cheat a lot of pre-war Los Angelinos out of their water rights.
The new discovery, however, should not heighten the concern of jittery Angelinos because geologists knew that a blind thrust must have been down there, says Dolan.
Along with its aftershocks, the quake was responsible for at least six deaths and more than $100 million in damage, giving Angelinos a tiny taste of a much larger quake expected to hit the San Andreas fault in the next several decades.