ACE inhibitor

(redirected from Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)
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ACE inhibitor

 (ās)
n.
Any of a class of drugs that cause vasodilation and are used to treat hypertension and heart failure.

[a(ngiotensin) c(onverting) e(nzyme) inhibitor.]

ACE inhibitor

n
(Pharmacology) any one of a class of drugs, including captopril, enalapril, and ramipril, that cause the arteries to widen by preventing the synthesis of angiotensin: used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure
[C20: from a(ngiotensin-)c(onverting) e(nzyme) inhibitor]

ACE′ inhib`itor

(eɪs, ˈeɪˈsiˈi)
n.
any of a group of vasodilator drugs used in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure.
[1980–85; A(ngiotensin)-C(onverting) E(nzyme)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ACE inhibitor - an antihypertensive drug that blocks the formation of angiotensin II in the kidney, leading to relaxation of the arteriesACE inhibitor - an antihypertensive drug that blocks the formation of angiotensin II in the kidney, leading to relaxation of the arteries; promotes the excretion of salt and water by inhibiting the activity of the angiotensin converting enzyme; also used to treat congestive heart failure
antihypertensive, antihypertensive drug - a drug that reduces high blood pressure
Capoten, captopril - a drug (trade name Capoten) that blocks the formation of angiotensin in the kidneys resulting in vasodilation; used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure
enalapril, Vasotec - an ACE inhibitor (trade name Vasotec) that blocks the formation of angiotensin in the kidney and so results in vasodilation; administered after heart attacks
lisinopril, Prinival, Zestril - an ACE inhibiting drug (trade names Prinival or Zestril) administered as an antihypertensive and after heart attacks
Altace, ramipril - an ACE inhibitor (trade name Altace) used to treat high blood pressure or in some patients who have had a heart attack
Mavik, trandolapril - an ACE inhibiting drug (trade name Mavik) used in some patients after a heart attack or to treat hypertension
References in periodicals archive ?
Withholding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) 24 hours before noncardiac surgery has been associated with a 30-day lower risk for all-cause death, stroke, myocardial injury, and intra operative hypotension (18% adjusted relative risk reduction).
It evaluated 4,401 patients with T2D, Stage 2 or 3 CKD (defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of >=30 to 300 to <=5,000 mg/g), who were receiving standard of care including a maximum tolerated labeled daily dose of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers.
30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is associated with an increased risk for lung cancer compared with angiotensin receptor blockers, according to a study published online Oct.
We used beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on the 1st day of admission.
This includes angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (sartans) and aldosterone antagonists.
Raebel, "Hyperkalemia Associated with Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers," Cardiovascular Therapeutics, vol.
A meta-analysis reporting effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in patients without heart failure.
The review included medications from the five main classes of antihypertensives, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and thiazides.
For example, in non-African American patients, thiazide diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are first-line treatments (Table 3).
Fiskio et al., "An evaluation of risk factors for adverse drug events associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors," Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, vol.
Patients' adherence to medication is a major component of heart failure self-management, and commonly prescribed therapies include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), beta-blockers (BB), direct renin inhibitors (DRI), and diuretics for patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction.
The global dilated cardiomyopathy therapeutics market report estimates the market size (Revenue USD million - 2013 to 2020) for key market segments based on the drug classes (aldosterone antagonists, angiotensin ii receptor blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and beta-blockers) and clinical pipeline analysis of phase 1, 2 and 3 drugs, and forecasts growth trends (CAGR% - 2016 to 2020).

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