modified

(redirected from Angle's classification of malocclusion)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Angle's classification of malocclusion: Maloccluded

mod·i·fy

 (mŏd′ə-fī′)
v. mod·i·fied, mod·i·fy·ing, mod·i·fies
v.tr.
1. To change in form or character; alter.
2. To make less extreme, severe, or strong: refused to modify her stand on the issue.
3. Grammar To qualify or limit the meaning of. For example, summer modifies day in the phrase a summer day.
4. Linguistics To change (a vowel) by umlaut.
v.intr.
To be or become modified; change.

[Middle English modifien, from Old French modifier, from Latin modificāre, to measure, limit : modus, measure; see med- in Indo-European roots + -ficāre, -fy.]

mod′i·fi′a·bil′i·ty n.
mod′i·fi′a·ble adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.modified - changed in form or charactermodified - changed in form or character; "their modified stand made the issue more acceptable"; "the performance of the modified aircraft was much improved"
qualified - limited or restricted; not absolute; "gave only qualified approval"
varied - characterized by variety; "immigrants' varied ethnic and religious traditions"; "his work is interesting and varied"
unmodified - not changed in form or character
2.modified - mediocre
qualified - limited or restricted; not absolute; "gave only qualified approval"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

modified

adjective
Not total, unlimited, or wholehearted:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
This finding is in agreement with earlier studies done by other researchers.2627 No correlation between angle's classification of malocclusion and Bolton's discrepancy was shown by Crosby and Alexander.
Angle's classification of malocclusion with the headache group: (p = .399).
Angle's classification of malocclusions is univer-sally accepted because of its simplicity as a method of description and communication between dental profes-sionals.