azimuth

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Related to Angle of azimuth: Zenith Angle

az·i·muth

 (ăz′ə-məth)
n.
1. The horizontal angular distance from a reference direction, usually the northern point of the horizon, to the point where a vertical circle through a celestial body intersects the horizon, usually measured clockwise. Sometimes the southern point is used as the reference direction, and the measurement is made clockwise through 360°.
2. The horizontal angle of an observer's bearing, measured clockwise from a reference direction such as true north.
3. The horizontal angle of a projectile's motion, measured relative to a reference direction such as true north.

[Middle English azimut, from Old French, from Arabic as-sumūt, pl. of as-samt, the way, compass bearing : al-, the + samt, way (from Latin sēmita, path; see mei- in Indo-European roots).]

az′i·muth′al (-mŭth′əl) adj.
az′i·muth′al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

azimuth

(ˈæzɪməθ)
n
1. (Astronomy) astronomy nautical the angular distance usually measured clockwise from the north point of the horizon to the intersection with the horizon of the vertical circle passing through a celestial body. Compare altitude3
2. (Navigation) astronomy nautical the angular distance usually measured clockwise from the north point of the horizon to the intersection with the horizon of the vertical circle passing through a celestial body. Compare altitude3
3. (Surveying) surveying the horizontal angle of a bearing clockwise from a standard direction, such as north
[C14: from Old French azimut, from Arabic as-sumūt, plural of as-samt the path, from Latin semita path]
azimuthal adj
ˌaziˈmuthally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

az•i•muth

(ˈæz ə məθ)

n.
1. the arc of the horizon measured clockwise from the south point, in astronomy, or from the north point, in navigation, to the point where a vertical circle through a given heavenly body intersects the horizon.
2. (in surveying) the angle of horizontal deviation, measured clockwise, of a bearing from a standard direction, as from north or south.
[1350–1400; Middle English azimut < Middle French « Arabic as sumūt the ways (i.e., directions)]
az`i•muth′al (-ˈmʌθ əl) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

az·i·muth

(ăz′ə-məth)
The horizontal angle measured clockwise between a celestial object and the northern point of the horizon as seen by the observer. Azimuth and altitude are the coordinates used to navigate with respect to the stars.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

azimuth

Quantities may be expressed in positive quantities increasing in a clockwise direction, or in X, Y coordinates where south and west are negative. They may be referenced to true north or magnetic north depending on the particular weapon system used.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.azimuth - the azimuth of a celestial body is the angle between the vertical plane containing it and the plane of the meridian
angle - the space between two lines or planes that intersect; the inclination of one line to another; measured in degrees or radians
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
azimut

azimuth

n (Astron) → Azimut nt or m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
where [W.sub.a] is the azimuth extension, [B.sub.r] the transmitted pulse bandwidth, and [[theta].sub.az] the rotation angle of azimuth beam.
Due to the wide accumulating angle of azimuth and wide bandwidth of LFUWB-SAR, aspect TF features of scatterings abound with a large amount of target information.