angle of attack

(redirected from Angles of attack)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

angle of attack

n.
The acute angle between the chord of an airfoil and a line representing the undisturbed relative airflow.

angle of attack

n
(Aeronautics) the acute angle between the chord line of an aerofoil and the undisturbed relative airflow. Also called: angle of incidence

an′gle of attack′


n.
the acute angle between the chord of an aircraft wing or other airfoil and the direction of airflow.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.angle of attack - the acute angle between the direction of the undisturbed relative wind and the chord of an airfoil
angle of incidence, incidence angle - the angle that a line makes with a line perpendicular to the surface at the point of incidence
References in periodicals archive ?
However Pattison has worked his socks off even when injured and he showed a great tempo as he worked at range and then got inside again, working good angles of attack to keep Malloy on edge.
Engineers tested the lift, drag and side forces on the SDB II model at different angles of attack, and will analyze the data gathered in the next few months.
At very large angles of attack, the blade "stalls" and the lift decreases again.
It states, "Airplanes operate at low airspeeds and at high angles of attack during the takeoff/departure and approach/landing phases of flight.
This is done for a better visualization as common angles of attack are 0[degrees] to 0.
The acceptable range of angles of attack is fairly small, and gets considerably smaller at higher speeds, such as cruise speed.
The operation of gas-turbine engine compressor aerofoil grids at supercritical angles of attack (angles of flow acceleration) is connected with the appearance of intensive areas of flow separation on the blade surfaces.
Angles of Attack is available for purchase online through the author's website, from the publisher, Amazon.
At higher angles of attack, the boundary layer thickens more dramatically, but the near-stagnant air slows even more and remains laminar.
The aerodynamic requirements at these blade positions are obtaining higher maximum lift coefficients at higher angles of attack [3].
Share with them how variables can affect results and that the only variable that they want in this activity is to test the various airfoil shapes they have constructed at three different angles of attack.
L] are the drag and lift coefficients, respectively, [rho] is the fluid density and A is the projection area of the model for different angles of attack used in this study.