Anglicist

An·gli·cist

 (ăng′glĭ-sĭst)
n.
A specialist in English language and literature.

Anglicist

(ˈæŋɡlɪsɪst) or

Anglist

n
rare an expert in or student of English literature or language

An•gli•cist

(ˈæŋ glə sɪst)

n.
a specialist in or authority on the English language or English literature.
[1865–70]

Anglicist

an authority on the English language or English literature.
See also: English
Translations
anglistaanglistka
AnglizistAnglizistin
anglistanglistkinja

anglicist

[ˈæŋglɪsɪst] Nanglicista mf

anglicist

nAnglist(in) m(f)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The neo-conservative arguments against a more inclusive curriculum during the culture wars in 1980s America and the Anglicist claims made in colonial India are also analogous, or at least resonant.
Fortunately, I can refer readers to an important Festschrift on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday and a recent Gedenkschrift which illuminate the "other" or Anglicist side of his achievements as a major Anglicist-comparatist; these publications concentrate on, among other things, his international standing as a pre-eminent Huxley expert.
The Minute is noted for its disparaging description of the entire literary heritage of India and Arabia and its promotion of an Anglicist (English language) education policy to create "a class of persons, Indian in blood and colour, but English in taste, in opinions, in morals, and in intellect.
There is a striking irony in the fact that the views of a path-breaking Orientalist, trained under the aegis of Hastings, and in the very year of the foundation of the Asiatick Society, should coincide with those of James Mill, whose History of British India (1817) reveals an Anglicist and utilitarian bias against the Brahmans who `artfully clothe themselves with the terrors of religion' in their endorsement of a traditional caste-ridden, superstition-ridden India.
Their treatment in Cannon's book deserves brief mention as serving to point up the problems facing the Anglicist who deals with Chaucer's lexis without being familiar with the complexities of the trilingual situation in medieval England, a situation hardly clarified by the many pitfalls lurking in the dictionaries of medieval French and the inadequacies of the current dictionaries of English, both medieval and modern, in the area of etymology.
discovered a model of women's writing in colonized India that neither Orientalist positions (such as William Jones's) nor Anglicist positions (such as Thomas Babbington Macaulay's) could fully comprehend or articulate.
The General Editor describes the policy for the whole set thus: 'Contributors have been chosen purely on the grounds of expertise and knowledge, and have been encouraged to write their contributions in the way they see most fitting, whilst at the same time taking full account of developments in linguistic theory'; the main projected audience is both 'the anglicist who does not specialise in the particular area to hand and .
These documents extend from the 1781 minute by Governor-General Warren Hastings setting forth the establishment of the Calcutta Madrasa for the education of Muslims and a letter of 1792 by East India Company Resident at Banaras Jonathan Duncan proposing to Governor-General Cornwallis the creation of Sanskrit College for Hindus, beyond the resolution of 1835 of Governor-General Lord Bentinck that gave what has often been taken as a definitive victory to the Anglicist faction, to the Court of Directors' dispatch of--the book's title notwithstanding--1841 to Governor-General Lord Auckland, which approved a compromise.
This aim is too optimistic for a work by a single author: Doane writes as an Anglicist explaining Old Saxon to other Anglicists, and it is they who are likely to appreciate this volume.
Along with an account of his early years, which does not always escape the hagiographical tone of its Bengali sources, Hatcher deconstructs the mix of attitudes: Cosmopolitan Orientalist (Jones), Evangelical Vernacularist (Carey), Improving Orientalist (Wilson), Improving Anglicist (Roy), and more, which were operative in Vidyasagar's milieu.
Vauchez's earlier work tends still to be better known among European than Anglicist mediaeval scholars, so his short but characteristically lucid and authoritative survey of changing models of lay holiness is welcome.
Of course, historically speaking, it does not seem to trouble Inden that Mill was a member of the Anglicist faction in the East India Company who was violently anti-Orientalist in his interpretation of Hinduism and his view of the Hindu past.