Anglicist

An·gli·cist

 (ăng′glĭ-sĭst)
n.
A specialist in English language and literature.

Anglicist

(ˈæŋɡlɪsɪst) or

Anglist

n
rare an expert in or student of English literature or language

An•gli•cist

(ˈæŋ glə sɪst)

n.
a specialist in or authority on the English language or English literature.
[1865–70]

Anglicist

an authority on the English language or English literature.
See also: English
Translations
anglistaanglistka
AnglizistAnglizistin
anglistanglistkinja

anglicist

[ˈæŋglɪsɪst] Nanglicista mf

anglicist

nAnglist(in) m(f)
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Nearly nobody from us was fluent in English or French." Werner Michaelis became a GDR speaker at IAMCR's Warsaw conference also because he was an educated Anglicist. Literature from the Eastern Bloc could not be a substitute for the missing input from the West.
By quoting Macaulay in the epigraph, Byron not only highlights the Macaulayan Anglicist agenda, whereby English education took root in India, but also his own acceptance of that state of affairs.
The neo-conservative arguments against a more inclusive curriculum during the culture wars in 1980s America and the Anglicist claims made in colonial India are also analogous, or at least resonant.
We therefore have, in terms of human resources, two Spanish Anglicists, a British Hispanist and a British Anglicist who lives in Spain; in other words, an appropriate team for a solid coverage of the topic in question.
Rudolph demonstrates the role politicians deliberately play in creating conceptions of civilizations as she analyzes the existence of four variants of Indian civilization within 250 years (mid-18th until 21st century): orientalist, anglicist, Indian, and Hindu nationalist.
The first two visitors, both lycee teachers in France, were Rene Galland, an Anglicist, in 1912-1913, and in 1913-14, Jean Bourquin, an "agrege des lettres," who would die during the war.
Fortunately, I can refer readers to an important Festschrift on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday and a recent Gedenkschrift which illuminate the "other" or Anglicist side of his achievements as a major Anglicist-comparatist; these publications concentrate on, among other things, his international standing as a pre-eminent Huxley expert.
Arguing that German loyalty to Britain could only be achieved by a process of "Anglicist" education, Smith asserted: "Whenever we can teach (the Germans) to distinguish between French and English governments, especially if they are also united to us by a common language, it is to be hoped that no efforts of our enemies will ever be able to draw them from us" (Letter to Thomas Chandler [May 20, 1754]).
The Minute is noted for its disparaging description of the entire literary heritage of India and Arabia and its promotion of an Anglicist (English language) education policy to create "a class of persons, Indian in blood and colour, but English in taste, in opinions, in morals, and in intellect." While this Minute was significant for the development of British policy in India, it cannot be used alone to explain the variety of imperial objectives, including the ideas of "cultural imperialists." Competing interests on all sides of the debates regarding education and social reform supported or disagreed with Macaulay.
There is a striking irony in the fact that the views of a path-breaking Orientalist, trained under the aegis of Hastings, and in the very year of the foundation of the Asiatick Society, should coincide with those of James Mill, whose History of British India (1817) reveals an Anglicist and utilitarian bias against the Brahmans who `artfully clothe themselves with the terrors of religion' in their endorsement of a traditional caste-ridden, superstition-ridden India.
However viewed, Gruffydd's association of Iolo with Langland (sixty years before any Anglicist associated Langland with Iolo) is certainly a vindication of progress.(5)
In view of the library's considerable holdings of English-language titles, it was only natural that Schowerling the 'Anglicist' and expert on English Romanticism became the initiator of the Corvey Project based at the University of Paderborn.