Anglo-Saxonism

Anglo-Saxonism

a belief in the innate superiority of the “Anglo-Saxon race.”
See also: Nationalism
anything characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon race, especially any linguistic peculiarity that sterns from Old English and has not been affected by another language.
See also: Language
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References in periodicals archive ?
As Buonomo himself had reminded the reader in his discussion of Anglo-Saxonism (citing Etienne Balibar), racism is a tool of exclusive nationalism.
Studies of the mythologies promoting an English empire in the sixteenth century (by Glyn Parry), the transfer of English republican ideas to the American colonies (by David Walker), and the concept of Anglo-Saxonism (by Tanja Bueltmann) fall, loosely, into the category of political or intellectual (or quasi-intellectual) history, whereas most contributors are searching for expressions of an English national identity among the English overseas, specifically in the United States and the "white" dominions.
imperialism (what Ruskola calls "American racial Anglo-Saxonism") in Asia accompanied, in other words, a U.S.
The Yanks are Coming Over There: Anglo-Saxonism and American Involvement in the First World War
Facing a revived transnational Anglo-Saxonism and increased Protestant Irish migration to North America in the postbellum era, Irish-American nationalists and their newspapers continued to promote a pluralist vision of American identity and themselves as model citizens and defenders of republican principles the world over.
CHOMSKY: There's a strange myth of Anglo-Saxonism. When the University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson, for example, its law school offered the study of "Anglo-Saxon Law." And that myth of Anglo-Saxonism carries right over into the early twentieth century.
The second longer section presents a series of readings focused Lyra's motherly triumvirate in Phil Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy anglo-saxonism in Harry Potter; the relevance of young adult literature; China Mieville and radical fantasy for children and young adults; postcolonial speculative fiction in Africa; race, gender and colonization in Nalo Hopkinson's Midnight Robber; the stories of Margo Lanagan; the politics of zombies in young-adult fiction; and the explosion of fantasy films in the 21st century.
Mencken's creation of "Conrad" in his many reviews, books, and articles as a counter-argument to the then raging pressures against immigration and for isolationism and nativist Anglo-Saxonism. The German-American, whose writings were marked by his own sense of alienation and homelessness, was especially keen on celebrating Conrad as "an unmelted British immigrant" (54) and a cosmopolitan figure of a profoundly comprehensive point of view.
In Gentleman's Agreement, directed by Elia Kazan, Peck was Phil Green-cum-Greenberg, a gentile journalist who goes undercover as a Jewish man to investigate anti-Semitism in New York and its affluent suburb, Darien, Connecticut--an epicenter of Anglo-Saxonism. The movie, controversial in its time, garnered three Academy Awards, for Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress and Best Director.
An introduction and 14 essays from English and American scholars tackle aspects of what could be termed Anglo-Saxonism', the fruits of a conference organised by the Faculty of English at Oxford University in 2008.
While she says that early fashioning of Anglo-Saxonism is the "'ancient' ballad structure" for the "full orchestral and eugenist racist symphonies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries" (5), in many ways her book instead proposes that the music of modern racism is the basic structure for an earlier system.