Anglocentric


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An·glo·cen·tric

 (ăng′glō-sĕn′trĭk)
adj.
Centered or focused on England or the English, especially in relation to historical or cultural influence: "[His] view of American culture from its very origins is almost truculently Anglocentric" (Jack Miles).

An′glo·cen′trism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wipe-out for much of our manufacturing base, civil disobedience by farmers, increasing anglocentric power-grab and reversal of our tenuous devolution settlement are either by-products of Johnson's Churchillian blunderbuss or part of a wider rollback devolution Westminster "take back control" narrative.
Wipe-out for much of our manufacturing base, civil disobedience by our farmers, an increasing anglocentric powergrab and reversal of our tenuous devolution settlement are all either by-products of Johnson's Churchillian blunderbuss that is a no-deal Brexit or part of a wider rollback devolution Westminster "take back control" narrative.
Another said that "there was more Welsh in Star Trek," whilst another said it was very "Anglocentric."
This 6-dimension model can be converted into a 2-dimensional one that contrasts Africentric (pro-Black, anti-White, pan African, and Third World orientations combined) and Eurocentric (pro-White and anti-Black orientations combined) motivational orientations (the latter was originally called Anglocentric).
Likewise, systems that operate heedless of those concerns can have significant negative impacts on students' sense of belonging; for example, the Anglocentric structure of most SIS name fields forces students from other cultures to alter their names to make them conform to the conventions of the data system.
In literary history, this approach is represented by John Kerrigan's call "to strip away modern Anglocentric and Victorian imperial paradigms to recover the long, braided histories played out across the British-Irish archipelago" (2008, 2).
And Louis is an anglocentric account of a French ruler.
Somehow, for reasons I've never seen successfully explained, England's enthusiasm for the Second World War (or an Anglocentric version of it) has grown as the event itself has receded, perpetuating old notions of difference and moral superiority.
Professor Lee challenges accepted, Anglocentric models of East-West relations and offers a radical reconceptualization of the English Renaissance, suggesting it was not so different from current developments in an increasingly Sinocentric world, and that as China, in particular, returns to a global center-stage that it last occupied pre-1800, a curious and overlooked synergy exists between the early modern and the present.
Eliot's Anglocentric piece 'Was There a Scottish Literature?' (1919) to provide a more Scotocentric reassessment, review developments in literature and attitudes which have occurred since then, and posit questions about the future.
However, by creating a rift between Emirati law and an Anglocentric judicial system that can take precedence over local law, the free zones are increasingly becoming closed-off enclaves, highlighting the growing divisions within Emirati society.
For a multidisciplinary (albeit Anglocentric) approach to the narrower focus of piracy, one might read Copyright and Piracy (Bently, Davis, & Ginsburg, 2010).