Anglocentric

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An·glo·cen·tric

 (ăng′glō-sĕn′trĭk)
adj.
Centered or focused on England or the English, especially in relation to historical or cultural influence: "[His] view of American culture from its very origins is almost truculently Anglocentric" (Jack Miles).

An′glo·cen′trism n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Good Girls, Bad Girls: Anglocentrism and Diversity in the Constitution of Contemporary Girlhood.
Given that more than a third of the novels read in Britain between 1660 and 1770 were translations of French fictions and fictions that seemed largely indifferent to the question of national origin until the mid-eighteenth century, one has to ask why this retroactive Anglocentrism has taken over the history of the novel.
Cherry and her daughter also represent the hope for a utopian, matriarchal society in which ethnic/cultural differences and traditional concepts of latinidad and Anglocentrism are questioned, and where paradigms of gender domination are subverted.
Above all, Song wants to delineate how "Milton's Anglocentrism is located within an international matrix" in hopes of revealing the poet's quest for an "elusive universality" (14).
One may also wonder about a critique of Anglocentrism that has so little to say about the Spanish-speaking Atlantic.
Here he importantly begins by noting the global nature of utopianism, thereby breaking with the Anglocentrism that is too often associated with the production of utopian thought.
The historical map charted by Anzaldua details in particular the annexation of Northern Mexico by the United States and the subsequent imposition of Anglocentrism, listing consecutive stages in the cultural appropriation of the local Chicana/o population, whose customs and communal knowledge had been consistently erased by the US educational system.
While earlier figures in the language debates of the period sought to enforce this Anglocentrism through corporate education schemes or punitive legislation-and Miller has fascinating discussions of Henry Ford and Theodore Roosevelt in this regard-he is centrally concerned with the 'cultural turn' in popular philology which became dominant after many of these more naked attempts to enforce monlingualism had been abandoned.
Particularly valuable in light of the characteristic anglocentrism of Tudor historiography is a chapter on Wales in the context of what S.
The imbalance may arise from Burleigh's unadulterated Anglocentrism, which in turn underlies wrathful rejection of the (mostly correct) location by scholars of the strategic center of World War II in the Soviet-German war of 1941-1945--a truth that does not diminish the heroism, sacrifice, and enormous contribution of Western soldiers, sailors, and flyers to the banishment of Nazism from the world.
Anita Harris (New York: Routledge, 2004); Christine Griffin, "Good Girls, Bad Girls: Anglocentrism and Diversity in the Constitution of Contemporary Girlhood," in Harris, All about the Girl, 33.
Firstly, the anglocentrism of Hage's analysis and his uncritical position in relation to white sovereignty manifests in this definition of 'colonial paranoia' because this definition, or this component of his argument, is premised upon seeing the project of colonialism as a 'fait accompli'.