Anglomania

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An·glo·ma·ni·a

 (ăng′glō-mā′nē-ə, -mān′yə)
n.
A strong predilection for anything English.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Anglomania

(ˌæŋɡləʊˈmeɪnɪə)
n
excessive respect for English customs, etc
ˌAngloˈmaniˌac n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

An•glo•ma•ni•a

(ˌæŋ gləˈmeɪ ni ə, -ˈmeɪn yə)

n.
an excessive devotion to English institutions, manners, customs, etc.
[1780–90, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Anglomania

an extreme devotion to English manners, customs, or institutions.
See also: England
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anglomania - an excessive enthusiasm for all things EnglishAnglomania - an excessive enthusiasm for all things English
enthusiasm - a lively interest; "enthusiasm for his program is growing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Anglomania

nAnglomanie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
WHILE he feasted his eyes upon Aglaya, as she talked merrily with Evgenie and Prince N., suddenly the old anglomaniac, who was talking to the dignitary in another corner of the room, apparently telling him a story about something or other--suddenly this gentleman pronounced the name of "Nicolai Andreevitch Pavlicheff" aloud.
At the outset, English correctness reinforced by snobbery and further backed up by what Mencken calls "Anglomaniacs" prevailed over American latitudinarian inventiveness.
Sir Isaiah Berlin called Chaim Weizmann an Anglomaniac, a good phrase: British Jews as a whole were Anglomaniacs.