anglosphere

(redirected from Anglophone world)

Anglosphere

(ˈæŋɡləʊˌsfɪə)
n
(Sociology) a group of English-speaking countries that share common roots in British culture and history, usually the UK, the US, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada
Translations

anglosphere

nAnglosphäre f
References in periodicals archive ?
Ismail Kadare is one of the most lauded writers-in-translation in the English language, certainly one of Europe's most important writers, and virtually the singular representative of Albanian culture to the anglophone world.
Literary Location and Dislocation of Myth in the Post/Colonial Anglophone World
Interest in Agincourt has been perennial in the anglophone world.
This new book, which traces the turbulent trajectory of the CNT and the place of anarchism within it in the decades before the Second Republic, thus provides a great service to those in the Anglophone world interested in the earlier history of the Spanish anarchist movement.
The only cases reported in the Anglophone world are those which have shocked even the Dutch media for whom euthanasia has become just another billboard on the cultural landscape.
I think we are more used in the Anglophone world to distinguished poets and prose writers also being translators, with no diminishment of their primary activity — from Nabokov to Richard Howard , and now Lydia Davis .
Secondary bibliography has grown proportionally, especially in Italy and the Anglophone world, with Anthony Grafton's Leon Battista Alberti: Master Builder of the Italian Renaissance (Harmondsworth, 2000) being especially influential--indeed, more books and articles on Alberti have been published from the end of the last century to the present than appeared in the preceding five centuries.
While in the Anglophone world the holiday has been dubbed Bastille Day, in France it is known as "Le Quatorze Juillet" (The 14th of July ) or "La FAaAaAeA te Nationale" (National Day).
1 [2016]: 72-91), only four others on German Romantic art have been defended since 2000 in the Anglophone world, none of which have been published.
Kahn and Suzanne Rutland hone in on the nexus between Jewish migration, settlement and international commerce, here too focusing on the Anglophone world.
In our own allegedly more progressive age, politicians of all parties throughout the anglophone world call into question the value of a liberal education.
Kalliney argues that we should look at the postwar period in literary culture in the Anglophone world as a brief moment when exchanges, collaborations, and partnerships were possible between the aging generation of metropolitan modernist writers/cultural gatekeepers and a new generation of colonial and decolonizing writers and intellectuals.