Anglo-Saxon

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An·glo-Sax·on

(ăng′glō-săk′sən)
n.
1. A member of one of the Germanic peoples, the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes, who settled in Britain in the fifth and sixth centuries.
2. Any of the descendants of the Anglo-Saxons, who were dominant in England until the Norman Conquest of 1066.
4. A person of English ancestry.
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of Anglo-Saxons, their descendants, or their language or culture; English.

Anglo-Saxon

n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of any of the West Germanic tribes (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes) that settled in Britain from the 5th century ad and were dominant until the Norman conquest
2. (Languages) the language of these tribes. See Old English
3. any White person whose native language is English and whose cultural affiliations are those common to Britain and the US
4. informal plain blunt English, esp English containing taboo words
adj
5. (Linguistics) forming part of the Germanic element in Modern English: 'forget' is an Anglo-Saxon word.
6. (Peoples) of or relating to the Anglo-Saxons or the Old English language
7. (Languages) of or relating to the Anglo-Saxons or the Old English language
8. of or relating to the White Protestant culture of Britain, Australia, and the US
9. informal (of English speech or writing) plain and blunt
10. of or relating to Britain and the US, esp their common legal, political, and commercial cultures, as compared to continental Europe

An•glo-Sax•on

(ˈæŋ gloʊˈsæk sən)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of any of the kingdoms formed by the West Germanic peoples who invaded and occupied Britain in the 5th and 6th centuries a.d.
2. (formerly) Old English (def. 1).
3. plain and simple English; blunt, monosyllabic, or vulgar language.
4. a native of England, or a person of English ancestry, esp. in the U.S.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to the Anglo-Saxons, or to the period of Anglo-Saxon dominance in Britain, ending with the Norman Conquest in 1066.
6. of or pertaining to Great Britain together with countries colonized by Britons, where English is the dominant language and most of the population is of European descent, as the United States.
7. of English ancestry.
[1605–15; New Latin, Medieval Latin Anglo-Saxōnēs, Anglī Saxōnēs (pl.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anglo-Saxon - a native or inhabitant of England prior to the Norman Conquest
Anglo-Saxon deity - (Anglo-Saxon mythology) a deity worshipped by the Anglo-Saxons
English person - a native or inhabitant of England
2.Anglo-Saxon - a person of Anglo-Saxon (especially British) descent whose native tongue is English and whose culture is strongly influenced by English culture as in WASP for `White Anglo-Saxon Protestant'; "in the ninth century the Vikings began raiding the Anglo-Saxons in Britain"; "his ancestors were not just British, they were Anglo-Saxons"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
English person - a native or inhabitant of England
3.Anglo-Saxon - English prior to about 1100
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
West Saxon - a literary dialect of Old English
Anglian - one of the major dialects of Old English
Jutish, Kentish - one of the major dialects of Old English
Adj.1.Anglo-Saxon - of or relating to the Anglo-Saxons or their language; "Anglo-Saxon poetry"; "The Anglo-Saxon population of Scotland"
Translations

Anglo-Saxon

[ˈæŋgləʊˈsæksən]
A. ADJanglosajón
B. N
1. (= person) → anglosajón/ona m/f
2. (Ling) → anglosajón m
ANGLO-SAXON
La lengua anglosajona, Anglo-Saxon, también llamada Old English, se extendió en Inglaterra tras las invasiones de pueblos germánicos en el siglo V y continuó usándose hasta la conquista normanda de la isla. Hoy en día sigue siendo una parte importante del idioma inglés. Como ejemplos de palabras de origen anglosajón que aún se usan tenemos man, child, eat, love o harvest.
El término se usa también para describir el mundo angloparlante, sobre todo si tiene su origen o está muy influido por costumbres inglesas, si bien hay personas de origen escocés, irlandés, galés o minorías étnicas que prefieren no usarlo.

Anglo-Saxon

n
(Hist: = person) → Angelsachse m, → Angelsächsin f
(= language)Angelsächsisch nt

Anglo-Saxon

[ˈæŋgləʊˈsæksən] adj & nanglosassone m/f
References in periodicals archive ?
According to John Higham, Anglo-Saxonist race thinkers held "a happy belief that the AngloSaxon has a marvelous capacity for assimilating kindred races, absorbing their valuable qualities, yet remaining basically unchanged.
THE fact that Nottingham is named for an AngloSaxon gentleman called Snot is just one of a number of unearthed details in a new reference book on Britain and Ireland place names.
PELTERET, The Challenges of Constructing the Prosopography of AngloSaxon England Database, en <<Medieval Prosopography>>, 22 (2001) 117-125.
THE Welsh are more likely to use the language of their old AngloSaxon enemies in everyday conversations than the English.
AngloSaxon literature was written before the Norman Conquest, and it was preserved in monastic libraries, to be rediscovered later; a considerable literature was written in Norman French for the Norman conquerors; and even the literature of the still earlier Celtic Britons was preserved in the form of the King Arthur stories popular all over Western Europe in the Middle Ages.
Indeed, considered in light of other characteristics of AngloSaxon Christianity, we might have expected them even to outdo the Fathers in zeal for the preservation of the word.
In the threepartite space of emerging social science, the French and German-Italian branches stuck significantly closer to the political and staatswissenschaftliche tradition than the Anglosaxon branch, and exemplified not so much a rupture with as an innovatory continuation of "Aristotelian" political philosophy, extending and generalizing its scope of analysis from state sovereignty towards a more inclusive theory of the generation and distribution of social power.
In this respect, the World Bank--being more distant and autonomous from member governments--is more susceptible to falling into this predicament and also to "reflecting a narrow predominantly anglosaxon view.
The importance of the concepts of 'volition' and 'mental effort' for the definition of these predicates becomes especially clear from the analysis of the work of AngloSaxon translators, who regularly use them to render L RECORDOR 'remember something with toil': (24)
He used Old English for what is now called 'early Middle English', and he retained Anglosaxon or Anglo-Saxon for what is now called 'Old English', or is now still called 'Anglo-Saxon'.
AngloSaxon re-enactors charge across Chamberlain Square outside Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery |
anglosaxon I've just watched a rep from the Student Union on Sky News saying the actions were acceptable and the only way their protests can be heard.