anicca


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Related to anicca: Vipassana

anicca

(ˈænikə)
n
(Buddhism) (in Theravada Buddhism) the belief that all things, including the self, are impermanent and constantly changing: the first of the three basic characteristics of existence. Compare anata, dukkha
[Pali, literally: impermanence]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Instead of dictating what 'anicca' (impermanence) and 'anatta' (not-self) are, for example, Cassaniti helps the reader understand such concepts more naturally by providing the reader with anecdotes of how such ideas are understood, expressed, and shared.
It emphasizes about Impermanence (Anicca) means nothing in our experience is long lasting and everything that is present now was not available in the past and what is there in the present would not be existing in the future.
Not surprisingly, she links their fatalistic statements with the fact that they are Buddhists, who learn that all things are anicca, impermanent.
impermanence (anicca), life's intrinsic frustration and discontent (dukkha), selfcultivation (bhavana), and the possibility of awakening to a deeper understanding of one's self.
In 2014 he brought a new band together to play and record his most recent work, which was released last year on the album Anicca.
But this line needs to be read as an allegory about the impermanence (i.e., anicca, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) or ultimate emptiness ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) of all conditioned existence, just as music inevitably fades away in time.
Music Words of Truth, Anicca, Hardtime, Last Words, Line 131, 9 p.m.
They subscribe to the Buddhist thought of impermanence (anicca), insubstantiality (anatta), illumination and enlightenment.
Anicca (Impermanance), Dukkha (Suffering) and Anatta (Non-self) were the spiritual guide lines our leaders have followed through centuries.
For Koyama, the Buddha's remedy in the Four Noble Truths that addresses dulkha (suffering), anicca (impermanence), and anatta (egolessness), the three marks of existence, implicitly left in place the image of a decaying world.
Given Buddhism's numerous tropes touching on empty reality--sunyata, anatta, anicca, yathabhuta, tathata, nirvana, dependent origination, a finger pointing to the moon, discarding the raft, dismounting the donkey, killing the Buddha, and so on--this resistance is darkly ironic.