aniconic

aniconic

(ˌænaɪˈkɒnɪk)
adj
(Art Terms) (of images of deities, symbols, etc) not portrayed in a human or animal form
[C19: from an- + iconic]
Translations
aniconique
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References in periodicals archive ?
(7) Johanna De Leeuw-Van Lohuizen 'The Representation of the Buddha's Birth and Death in the Aniconic Period' in (2007) Vol.
It is worth mentioning that the origin of the game dates back to Aniconic worship and during the celebration of 'Lai Haraoba', Mukna Knagjei was played to mark the end of the festival.
A similar development from aniconic to iconic representation occurred in early Christianity, while other traditions, most notably Islam and Judaism, are still opposed to visual representations of religious figures they consider holy--although the universality of this position has been challenged by recent scholarship.
'Ancient Jewish art is often thought to be aniconic, or lacking images.
(110) Yet interestingly, some earlier critics of Confucian image worship, such as Song Na [phrase omitted] (1310-1390) and Song Lian [phrase omitted] [phrase omitted] (1310-1381), had articulated their desire to return to the aniconic rituals of the Confucian classics without linking deviations from such practices to Buddhist influence (Sommer 2002: 118).
If one examines the tradition of iconoclasm in Islam, it is true that depicting faces has been a problem thus a lot of Islamic art is aniconic. Yet, the treatment of art that depicted faces was not about obliterating these images, but neutralising them.
But, for Crow, therein lies its importance: 'The break within orthodox Catholicism effected by the Jansenists thus provides an escape from the tautological agreement between doctrine and picturing' (p.8), offering some theological phase lines for understanding aniconic modernisms.
The local deities are aniconic or represented through insignia as opposed to the sculpturesque Mirkula Devi.
philosophy to revealing the misconception of the Jew as aniconic and
The paganistic creed uses aniconic representations of body parts, animals and other statues or items as symbols of the deity.
Each then proceeded to adapt these points of departure into aniconic work that carried an implicit refusal of the idolatrous implications of Renaissance humanism." But equally, as Kent's work makes clear, such art is not concerned with any transcendent or unrepresentable sublime that lies outside of this world.
First there is a stunning 15th-century ink-and-gold Hajj certificate, which doubles as an aniconic portrayal of the Prophet Mohammed, his sandal at its foot, his shrine near the top.