animal rights

(redirected from Animal-rights)
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animal rights

pl.n.
The right to humane treatment claimed on behalf of animals, especially the right to be treated as persons or more like persons under the law.

animal rights

pl n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. the rights of animals to be protected from exploitation and abuse by humans
b. (as modifier): the animal-rights lobby.

an′imal rights′


n.pl.
the rights of animals, claimed on ethical grounds, to humane treatment and protection from exploitation and abuse.
[1975–80]
Translations

animal rights

1. npldiritti mpl degli animali
2. adj (organization, activist) → animalista
References in periodicals archive ?
We can chalk this up to a decades-long harassment campaign from radical animal-rights activists, who alleged elephant mistreatment, taking its toll.
In an another article on growing animal rights awareness in Pakistan Anees Jillani, a lawyer at the Pakistan Supreme Court, makes a candid assessment of the state of Animal-Rights movements in Pakistan in comparison to its neighbors.
International animal-rights organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) staged the offbeat demonstration in a bid to raise Lebanon's awareness about the
Despite an outcry from animal-rights groups, Iceland is hunting whales for research.
It isn't surprising that the animal-rights movement has established a political action committee to help elect political candidates who support the animal-rights agenda.
If these animal-rights groups are permitted to get their way, researchers will move their laboratories out of this country, Fishbein contends.
No arrests were made, but suspicion fell on animal-rights activists.
The vast majority of animal research is devoted to finding cures for human diseases, But animal-rights supporters like McArdle believe such research is useless.
In 1990 animal-rights activists mailed this message to Walter Salinger, head of the psychology department at the University of North Carolina.
He opines, "The more extreme animal-rights activists are little more than the modern version of the old-time antivivisectionists"--as if this were a stinging indictment.