Animals


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Animals


the condition of having teeth without roots attached to the alveolar ridge of the jaws, as in certain animals. — acrodont, adj.
a parasitic relationship between animals that has a destructive effect on one and no effect on the other. See also biology; plants.
the realm of animals; the animal kingdom.
1. the state of being an animal.
2. animal existence or nature in human activity; the animal in man as opposed to the spiritual.
an animal with a tongue like that of man, as the parrot.
a creature resembling man, as an ape. — anthropoid, anthropoidal, adj.
the assignment of human feelings or passions to something not human, as a deity or an animal. — anthropopathic. adj.
a hoofed animal having an even number of toes or digits on each foot, as pigs, sheep, deer, etc. — artiodactylous, adj.
1. an advocate of kindness to animals.
2. British. an antivivisectionist.
a compiler or writer of bestiaries.
an allegorical or moralizing commentary based upon real or fabled animals, usually medieval and sometimes illustrated.
the study of the physiological processes of plants and animals. — biodynamic, biodynamical, adj.
the branch of ecology that studies the interrelationship of plant and animal life in their common environment. — bioecologist, n. — bioecologic, bioecological, adj.
the study of the relationship between structure and function in plants and animals. — biostatical, adj.
the animal or plant life of a particular region.
a method of movement, characteristic of certain animals, by swinging with the arms from one hold to another.
the branch of zoology that studies crustaceans. — carcinologist, n. — carcinologic, carcinological, adj.
a meat-eating animal. Cf. herbivore. — camivorous, adj.
a relationship between animals or plants in which one lives with or on the other without damage to either. Cf. parasitism.
a vital force in plants or animals, similar to human effort. See also plants.
an intense fear of contact with animal fur or skin. — doraphobe, n.
the study of sea urchins. — echinologist, n.
a nonparasitic relationship between animals in which one animal lives on the surface of the other.
a disease affecting many animals at the same time; an epidemic amongst animals. — epizootic, adj.
the science concerned with the factors involved in the occurrence and spread of animal diseases. — epizootiologic, epizootiological, adj.
the condition of being in rut or sexual arousal, applied particularly to the female. Also spelled estrum, oestrum. — estrous, oestrous, adj.
the study of animal behavior in relation to habitat. — ethologist, n. — ethological, adj.
haruspicy. — extispex, n. — extispicious, Obsolete, adj.
1. the animal life of a particular time or region.
2. a study of or treatise on the animal life of a particular time or region. — faunal, adj.
a person who studies or writes on animal life; a naturalist.
zoogeography.
haruspicy.
a form of divination by natural phenomena, especially from inspection of the entrails of animal sacrifices. Also called extispicy, haruspication. — haruspex, aruspex, n. — haruspical, adj.
the study of worms, especially internal worms.
a plant-eating animal. Cf. carnivore. — herbivorous, adj.
abnormal development, especially increased size, in plants or animals, usually as a result of cross-breeding.
an animal that inhabits the burrow, nest, or other habitation of another animal. — inquiline, adj.
a particular type of animal life whose absence is a characteristic of a region. — lipotypic, adj.
a disease, chiefly of farm animals, characterized by paralysis and impaired vision and caused by eating locoweed.
a mythical or fabulous beast with the head of a man, the body of a lion or tiger, and the feet and tail of a dragon or scorpion. Also spelled mantichora.
the branch of biology that studies the structure and form of animals and plants. — morphologist, n. — morphologic, morphological, adj.
an abnormal love for mice.
an abnormal fear of mice.
the science of the early or youthful stage of animal development. — nealogic, adj.
any animal or plant.
the scientific description of the organs of plants and animals and of their structure and function. — organographist, n. — organographic, organographical, adj.
the study of the organs of plants and animals. — organologist, n. — organologic, organological, adj.
pl. animals that lay eggs. Cf. ovovivipara, vivipara. — oviparity, n. — oviparous, adj.
pl. animals that lay eggs that are hatched in their bodies, so that young are born alive, without connection to a placenta.
a relationship between animals in which one gains sustenance from the other. Cf. commensalism. See also biology; plants.
a group with genetic relationship. Cf. phylum.
any of the major subdivisions of the plant or animal kingdom. Cf. phylon. See also linguistics.
a place where pigs are kept; pigpen; pigsty.
a carnivorous animal. — predaceous, predacious, adj.
a relation between organisms or animals in which one feeds on the other. — predatory, adj.
a plot of land, square or rectangular, marked off or set out for the study of plant or animal life.
1. rabbits collectively.
2. a place where rabbits live or are kept.
an animal or plant surviving in one area after becoming extinct else-where; a survival of an earlier period. — relict, adj.
a breeding or nesting place of rooks or of any gregarious bird or animal.
selective breeding to develop strains with particular characteristics. — stirpicultural, adj.
Rare. the business and art of raising swine.
the art of preparing, stuffing, and mounting the skins of animals so that they appear lifelike. — taxidermist, n.
a container for keeping small animals.
a form of divination based upon observation of the movements of animals. Also called zoomancy.
the worship of deities that are partly animal and partly human in form. Also called therianthropism, theriolatry. — theriomorphic, theriomorphous, adj.
the branch of biology that studies the breeding of domestic plants and animals.
a mammal having hoofs, as the cow, horse, etc. — ungulate, adj.
Obsolete. a cow house, shed, pasture, or other place where cows are kept. Also vachery.
a condition of some animals, and especially of some fowls, in which the female, when old, assumes some of the characteristics of the male of the species. — virilescent, adj.
an enclosed environment, as a glass container, in which plants or animals are raised under conditions that approximate their natural habitat. Also vivary.
a vivarium.
pl. animals that bear living young. Cf. ovipara, ovovivipara. — viviparity, n. — viviparous, adj.
1. the killing of a fox by methods other than by hunting it with hounds.
2. the killer of a fox.
a derangement in which a person believes himself to be an animal and acts accordingly. — zoanthropic, adj.
the science of veterinary surgery.
zoology.
the distribution of animal life by geographical location. — zoogeographer, n. — zoogeographic, zoogeographical, adj.
1. the generation of animals.
2. a study of animal generation. — zoogonic, zoogenic, adj.
1. the branch of zoology concerned with animal description.
2. pictorial art in general, but especially that which shows animals. — zoographer, n. — zoographic, zoographical, adj.
the worship of animal gods. Cf. theriomorphism. Also called zootheism. — zoolater, n.
the branch of biology that studies and classifles all living creatures. — zoologist, n. — zoological, adj.
a form of divination based upon the observation of animals or their movements under certain circumstances. Also called theriomancy.
an abnormal love of animals.
the measurement and comparison of the sizes of animals and their parts.
the attribution of animal form or nature, especially to a deity. — zoomorphic, adj.
the laws of animal life or the animal kingdom. — zoonomist, n. — zoonomic, adj.
the study or science of the diseases of animals; animal pathology. Also zoopathy.
zoopathology.
the performing of experiments on animals, especially the lower animals. — zooperal, adj.
a love of animals. — zoophile, n.
love of animals. — zoophilist, n. — zoophilous, adj.
an abnormal dread of animals. — zoophobe, n.
the study of animal physiology and form. — zoophysical, adj.
the physiology of animals, as distinct from that of humans.
an animal, as a sponge, coral, etc, that resembles a plant more than an animal; any of the Zoophyta. — zoophytic, zoophytical, zoophytoid, adj.
the branch of zoology concerned with the zoophytes. — zoophytological, adj.
the process of surgically grafting tissue from a lower animal onto the human body. — zooplastic, adj.
a form of hallucination in which the sufferer imagines he sees animals. Also zooscopy.
a branch of psychology that studies animal behavior.
zoopsia.
zoological classification; the scientific classification of animals.
the principles of animal husbandry. Also spelled zootechnics. — zootechnician, n. — zootechnical, adj.
the worship of animal gods; zoolatry. — zootheist, n.
1. the dissection of animals other than man.
2. the anatomy of animals. — zootomist, n. — zootomic, zootomical, adj.

Animals

 

See Also: BIRDS, INSECTS

  1. The cat … carried his tail like a raised sword —Helen Hudson
  2. The cat was sleeping on the floor like a tipped-over roller skate —Paul Theroux
  3. Crows … circle in the sky like a flight of blackened leaves —Stephen Vincent Benet
  4. Dogs … all snarls and teeth like knives —George Garrett
  5. Dog … with a marking down his breast like a flowing polka-dot tie. He was like a tiny shepherd —Eudora Welty
  6. Dour as a wet cat —Warren Beck
  7. Fins [on fish] like scimitars —Richard Maynard
  8. Frogs sparkling like wet suns —Margaret Atwood
  9. He [a dog] dragged her around the block like a horse pulling a wheelless carriage —Margaret Millar
  10. A herd of black and white cows moved slowly across a distant field, like pieces of torn paper adrift on a dark pond —Hilary Masters
  11. His tail [a cat’s] waved like a pine tree —Sheila Kaye-Smith
  12. The Llama is a wooly sort of fleecy hairy goat with an indolent expression and an undulating throat. Like an unsuccessful literary man —Hilaire Belloc
  13. [A cow] lying on her back like a fat old party in a bathtub —Edward Hoagland
  14. [A cat] purring like a Packard engine. It worked like a lullaby —Harold Adams
  15. Sheep huddled like fallen clouds —George Garrett
  16. Silver whiskers … like rice-threads —D. H. Lawrence
    The silver whiskers described by Lawrence belong to a fox, from which his story takes its title.
  17. Squirrels … fat as housecats —Doris Lessing
  18. Swarms of bees like a buzzing cloud flew from flower to flower —Erich Maria Remarque
  19. A white poodle … like an animated powder puff —Penelope Gilliatt
  20. Wings of the swans are folded now like the sheets of a long letter —Donald Justice
References in classic literature ?
Very early in my life, possibly because of the insatiable curiosity that was born in me, I came to dislike the performances of trained animals.
First, let all humans inform themselves of the inevitable and eternal cruelty by the means of which only can animals be compelled to perform before revenue-paying audiences.
On the one hand, it may be held that we have more knowledge of our own minds than those of animals, and that we should use this knowledge to infer the existence of something similar to our own mental processes in animals and even in plants.
The herd goes in that direction because the animal in front leads it and the collective will of all the other animals is vested in that leader.
He was very fond of animals and kept many kinds of pets.
The second lieutenant loaded the blunder busses, which could throw harpoons to the distance of a mile, and long duck-guns, with explosive bullets, which inflicted mortal wounds even to the most terrible animals.
In dim ways he recognised in man the animal that had fought itself to primacy over the other animals of the Wild.
Bahia Blanca -- Geology -- Numerous gigantic Quadrupeds -- Recent Extinction -- Longevity of species -- Large Animals do not require a luxuriant vegetation -- Southern Africa -- Siberian Fossils -- Two Species of Ostrich -- Habits of Oven-bird -- Armadilloes -- Venomous Snake, Toad, Lizard -- Hybernation of Animal -- Habits of Sea-Pen -- Indian Wars and Massacres -- Arrow-head, antiquarian Relic.
Zarathustra's voice also resounded in such a manner that his animals came to him frightened, and out of all the neighbouring caves and lurking-places all the creatures slipped away--flying, fluttering, creeping or leaping, according to their variety of foot or wing.
When we reflect on the vast diversity of the plants and animals which have been cultivated, and which have varied during all ages under the most different climates and treatment, I think we are driven to conclude that this greater variability is simply due to our domestic productions having been raised under conditions of life not so uniform as, and somewhat different from, those to which the parent-species have been exposed under nature.
But as there are many sorts of provision, so are the methods of living both of man and the brute creation very various; and as it is impossible to live without food, the difference in that particular makes the lives of animals so different from each other.
For should any one define in what sense each is an animal, his definition in the one case will be appropriate to that case only.