animism

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an·i·mism

 (ăn′ə-mĭz′əm)
n.
1. The belief in the existence of individual spirits that inhabit natural objects and phenomena.
2. The belief in the existence of spiritual beings that are separable or separate from bodies.
3. The hypothesis holding that an immaterial force animates the universe.

[From Latin anima, soul; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

an′i·mist n.
an′i·mis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

animism

(ˈænɪˌmɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the belief that natural objects, phenomena, and the universe itself have desires and intentions
2. (Philosophy) (in the philosophies of Plato and Pythagoras) the hypothesis that there is an immaterial force that animates the universe
[C19: from Latin anima vital breath, spirit]
ˈanimist n
animistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•i•mism

(ˈæn əˌmɪz əm)

n.
1. the belief that natural objects, natural phenomena, and the universe itself possess souls.
2. the belief that souls may exist apart from bodies.
3. belief in spiritual beings or agencies.
[1825–35; < Latin anim(a) (see anima) + -ism]
an′i•mist, n., adj.
an`i•mis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

animism

1. the belief that natural objects and phenomena and the universe itself possess souls and consciousness.
2. the belief in spiritual beings or agencies. — animist, n.animistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

animism

A belief in the existence of spirits dwelling in natural phenomena such as animals, tree, mountains, or storms.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.animism - the doctrine that all natural objects and the universe itself have souls; "animism is common among primitive peoples"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

animism

[ˈænɪmɪzəm] Nanimismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

animism

nAnimismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
History professor Joyce Colon added that babaylans not only fought to retain their animistic beliefs, but also played a role in the uprising against Spanish colonial masters.
They are a 'cheerful, kindhearted people' whose daily lives are heavily influenced by their animistic beliefs, Janamjam said.
Before the advent of Buddhism in the 6th century, the early Shinto consisted of a bunch of animistic beliefs according to which there was a kami ("deity") in everything that was animate or inanimate.
With the advent of Islam most of the animistic beliefs of the Malays have been discarded.
However, Korea's Christian segment is growing, now at roughly 30 percent (14 million), thus animistic beliefs are decreasing.
Stuckey's book provides an opportunity to ponder cultures that hold animistic beliefs about the natural world, and why animism (the belief that natural physical entities--including animals, plants, trees, mountains, rivers, and stones--possess a spiritual essence) is not a part of western thinking about nature.
Yet even as they freely adapted narrative strategies such as expressionism, surrealism, and the absurd, many of their stories germinated from legends, ancient myths, and animistic beliefs from Mexico's pre-Hispanic past.
He is also guided by animistic beliefs. "I try to kind of listen to the nature of the materials that I use," Shields says, "and try to hear what they want to be made into"--an idea reminiscent of Kandinsky's synesthesia.