ion exchange

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ion exchange

n.
A reversible chemical reaction between an insoluble solid and a solution during which ions may be interchanged, used in water softening and in the separation of radioactive isotopes.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ion exchange

n
(Chemistry) the process in which ions are exchanged between a solution and an insoluble solid, usually a resin. It is used to soften water, to separate radioactive isotopes, and to purify certain industrial chemicals
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

i′on exchange`


n.
the process of reciprocal transfer of ions between a solution and a resin or other suitable solid.
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ion exchange - a process in which ions are exchanged between a solution and an insoluble (usually resinous) solidion exchange - a process in which ions are exchanged between a solution and an insoluble (usually resinous) solid; widely used in industrial processing
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ion exchange

nscambio ionico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Validation by isoelectric focusing of the anion-exchange isotransferrin fractionation step involved in determination of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin by the CDTect assay.
Repeatability of peak area and retention time for rapid anion-exchange chromatography of pea proteins (Amac cultivar).
Here we report a GC/MS method for the quantification of serum estradiol in which estradiol is separated from the ether extract of serum samples by fractionation with a polystyrene divinylbenzene resin that has strong anion-exchange and adsorption properties.
Greater than 95% of the hexose sugars in the extracts were removed by first phosphorylating them with hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1), then binding them to anion-exchange resin (Tarpley et al., 1993).
Chromatographic columns were as follows: PRP-X100 anion-exchange columns (250 or 150 mm x 4.1 mm) from Hamilton Company; Zorbax[R] 300-SCX cation-exchange column (150 x 4.6 mm) from Hewlett Packard; and a Ionospher-C cation-exchange column (100 x 3 mm) from Chrompack Denmark ApS.
Rapid separation of a CDT fraction comprising isoforms with two, one, or no sialic acids and part of that with three sialic acids by anion-exchange chromatography on minicolumns followed by RIA (CDTect [TM]) has become widely used (5).
Other qualitative and quantitative methods have been reported (11-14), many of which include prepurification of PBG with anion-exchange resins, but all rely on the derivatization of PBG with Ehrlich-type reagent, which is not specific for PBG, and thus have the potential for false positives.
(14) found that EDTA and heparin may disturb in vitro [Fe.sup.3+]-Tf saturation and/or anion-exchange microcolumn non-CDT and CDT isoform fractionation (substance-specific data not given).
This can be done by electrophoretic or chromatographic procedures, e.g., isoelectric focusing (IEF) (7, 8), capillary zone electrophoresis (9), HPLC (10, 11), or anion-exchange chromatography on microcolumns (12).
To confirm this observation, we compared the Hb [A.sub.2] values obtained by HPLC and anion-exchange microchromatography (Quik-Sep; Isolab) in nine samples from Hb D heterozygotes.
The PSA complexes were applied to the PSA immunoaffinity column, eluted with 1 mL/L trifluoroacetic acid, pH 2.0, and fractionated further by anion-exchange chromatography.