Anne Sexton


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Related to Anne Sexton: Sylvia Plath
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Noun1.Anne Sexton - United States poet (1928-1974)
References in periodicals archive ?
Suicidal Tendencies in the Poetry of Anne Sexton." Literature and
But I tell you the most influential to me in terms of imagery, was Anne Sexton. I read all of her books, the first one was To Bedlam and Part Way Back.
Of the confessional poets of post-Second World War America, it has been said that none was "more consistently and uniformly confessional than Anne Sexton [...] her name has almost become identified with the genre" (Lerner 52).
It is thoroughly researched and uses examples from the many renditions of the story, including the familiar Grimm fairy tale and modern tales by Anne Sexton and Raoul Dahl.
Anne Sexton used to call her asylum a jail/I don't want to know how this brother earned his cell."
The issues came into focus following the publication of a biography of Anne Sexton, as it contained information from more than 80 hours of therapy that Ms.
The controversy over blocking software isn't limited to chicken breast recipes, breast cancer information, Anne Sexton, or "Superbowl XXX." These sites are accidentally censored by software programs that scan pages for certain keywords, as almost all of them do.
Marina Tsvietaieva, Paul Celan, Georg Trakl, Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, Cesare Pavese, Kostas Karyotakis, Maria Poliduri, John Berryman, llegando hasta "la pared de enfrente de la vida" mediante el suicidio.
In the twentieth century alone Virginia Woolf, Ezra Pound, Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Dylan Thomas, Samuel Beckett, Sylvia Plath, Eugene O'Neill and Anne Sexton have all suffered from the illness.
- Anne Sexton, "Is It True?" The Awful Rowing toward God
Desperate to draw a direct line between herself and such dark geniuses as Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, and Courtney Love, she succeeds only in getting the dark part right.
In a self-regarding passage from her bestselling book Prozac Nation, the glamorous young memoirist Elizabeth Wurtzel pretty much puts her finger on it: at a New York party Wurtzel finds herself in a funk and sprawled on a bathroom floor; from the depths of her lithiumless despond she compares herself to Plath and Anne Sexton as well as to a movie star.