anno Domini

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an·no Dom·i·ni

 (ăn′ō dŏm′ə-nī′, -nē′)
adv. Abbr. AD or ad
In a specified year of the Christian era.

[Medieval Latin annō Dominī : Latin annō, ablative of annus, year + Latin Dominī, genitive of Dominus, Lord.]

anno Domini

(ˈænəʊ ˈdɒmɪˌnaɪ; -ˌniː)
adv
the full form of AD
n
informal advancing old age
[Latin: in the year of our Lord]

ad1

(æd)

n.
1. an advertisement.
2. advertising: an ad agency.
[1835–45; by shortening]

ad2

(æd)

n. Tennis.
[1925–30; by shortening]

ad-

a prefix occurring in verbs or verbal derivatives borrowed from Latin, where it meant “toward” and indicated direction, tendency, or addition: adjoin. For variants before a following consonant, see a-5, ac-, af-, ag-, al-, an-2, ap-1, ar-, as-, at-.
[< Latin ad, ad- (preposition and prefix) to, toward, at, about; c. at1]

-ad1

,
1. a suffix occurring in loanwords from Greek denoting a group or unit comprising a certain number, sometimes of years: myriad; Olympiad; triad.
2. a suffix meaning “derived from,” “related to,” “associated with,” occurring in loanwords from Greek (dryad; oread) and in New Latin coinages on a Greek model (bromeliad; cycad).
3. a suffix used, on the model of Iliad, in the names of epics, speeches, etc., derived from proper names: Dunciad; jeremiad.
[< Greek -ad-, s. of -as]

-ad2

,
var. of -ade1: ballad; salad.

-ad3

,
a suffix used in anatomy to form adverbs from nouns signifying parts of the body, denoting a direction toward that part: ectad.
[< Latin ad toward, anomalously suffixed to the noun]

A.D.

or AD,

1. in the year of the Lord; since Christ was born: Charlemagne was born in a.d.742.
(Latin annō Dominī]
2. assembly district.
3. athletic director.
usage: The abbreviation a.d. was orig. placed before a date and is still usu. preferred in edited writing: The Roman conquest of Britain began in a.d.43 (or, sometimes, began a.d.43). The abbreviation b.c. (before Christ) is always placed after a date: Caesar was assassinated in 44 b.c. But by analogy with the position of b.c., a.d. is frequently found after the date in all types of writing: Claudius I lived from 10 b.c.to 54 a.d. This abbreviation may also designate centuries, being placed after the century specified: the second century a.d. Some writers prefer to use c.e. (Common Era) and b.c.e. (Before the Common Era) to avoid the religious overtones of a.d. and b.c.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.anno Domini - in the Christian era; used before dates after the supposed year Christ was born; "in AD 200"
Translations
après Jésus-Christ
etter Kristus

Anno Domini

[ˈænəʊˈdɒmɪnaɪ] N (frm) Anno Domini 43el año 43 después de Jesucristo
the third century Anno Dominiel siglo tercero de Cristo

anno Domini

n
(abbr AD) → nach Christus, Anno Domini; in 53 anno Dominiim Jahre 53 nach Christus
(inf: = age) → Alter nt

Anno Domini

[ˈænəʊˈdɒmɪnaɪ] advanno Domini
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References in periodicals archive ?
As the first-round matches got underway, WC Fields' famous dictum came to mind, along with my own First Law of Anno Domino (when the Lord first drew spots on lumps of bone) but, alas, too late.