perineum

(redirected from Anogenital distance)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

per·i·ne·um

 (pĕr′ə-nē′əm)
n. pl. per·i·ne·a (-nē′ə)
1. The portion of the body in the pelvis occupied by urogenital passages and the rectum, bounded in front by the pubic arch, in the back by the coccyx, and laterally by part of the hipbone.
2. The region between the scrotum and the anus in males, and between the posterior vulva junction and the anus in females.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin perinaeon, from Greek perinaion : peri-, peri- + inān, to excrete.]

per′i·ne′al (-nē′əl) adj.

perineum

(ˌpɛrɪˈniːəm)
n, pl -nea (-ˈniːə)
1. (Anatomy) the region of the body between the anus and the genital organs, including some of the underlying structures
2. (Anatomy) the nearly diamond-shaped surface of the human trunk between the thighs
[C17: from New Latin, from Greek perinaion, from peri- + inein to empty out]
ˌperiˈneal adj

per•i•ne•um

(ˌpɛr əˈni əm)

n., pl. -ne•a (-ˈni ə)
the area in front of the anus extending to the fourchette of the vulva in the female and to the scrotum in the male.
[1625–35; < New Latin < Greek períneon, períneos, perínaios]
per`i•ne′al, adj.

perineum

1. The part of the body between the anus and the genitals.
2. The pelvic floor, especially referring to the area of muscle and tissue between the vaginal opening and the anus that is susceptible to tearing in childbirth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perineum - the general region between the anus and the genital organsperineum - the general region between the anus and the genital organs
region, area - a part of an animal that has a special function or is supplied by a given artery or nerve; "in the abdominal region"
Translations
عجان
перинеум
hráz
mellemkød
Perineum
lahkliha
پرینهعجانمیاندوراه
väliliha
חיץ הנקבים
međica
gátperineum
회음부
tarpvietė
starpene
perineum
mellomkjøttetperineum
períneo
perineu
mellangård

perineum

[ˌperɪˈniːəm] N (perinea (pl)) → perineo m

perineum

n (Anat) → Damm m, → Perineum nt (spec)

per·i·ne·um

n. perineo, suelo pelviano delimitado anteriormente por la raíz del escroto en el hombre y la vulva en la mujer y posteriormente por el ano.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, in the present study we examined the relationship between first-trimester urinary metabolite concentrations of DEP, DBP, DEHP, and BBzP as well as DiNP in relation to anogenital distance in boys at 21 months of age.
Birth Defects Research (Part A -- 2011): found that in-utero exposure to BPA was related to anogenital distance (the physical distance between the anus and the genitalia) in male offspring.
We have observed in animal studies that anogenital distance (the distance between the scrotum and anus) is an important measure for genital development and may be shorter in males with abnormal testicular development and function," said lead author Michael Eisenberg, a male reproductive medicine and surgery fellow in the Scott Department of Urology at Baylor College of Medicine.
Leffers and his colleagues hypothesized, was demonstrated by some of the study's coauthors, who found in a linked investigation that intrauterine exposure to acetaminophen, at three times the recommended dose for humans, led to a reduction in anogenital distance among fetal rats, and also reduced testosterone production by about half in fetal rat testes.
SAN DIEGO -- Pregnant women exposed to relatively high levels of a common household chemical compound gave birth to male infants with significant reductions in anogenital distance and smaller-than-average penile volume, scrotal development, and testicular descent.
Moreover, boys with a short anogenital distance tended to have smaller penises and were far more likely to have testes that didn't descend properly into the scrotum.
Reproductive biology expert Professor Frederick von Saal, University of Missouri-Columbia in the US, said the male hormone testosterone had a direct effect on anogenital distance, causing it to be longer in males than in females.
Pregnant rats produced male offspring with decreased prostatic and seminal vesicular weights, delayed preputial separation and transient nipple development when given finasteride at > or =30 microg/kg/day (> or =3/10 of the recommended human dose) and decreased anogenital distance when given finasteride at > or =3 microg/kg/day (> or =3/100 of the recommended human dose).
Some of the most commonly used phthalates have been shown to cause outcomes in rats consistent with antiandrogenic effects, such as impaired spermatogenesis, undescended testes (cryptorchidism), and reduced anogenital distance (Borch et al.
This anogenital distance is slightly, but reliably, longer in males than in females--unless those males were exposed in the womb to pollutants, such as phthalates, that can alter fetal sex-hormone production.
Pregnant rats produced male offspring with decreased prostatic and seminal vesicular weights, delayed preputial separation and transient nipple development when given finasteride at > or equal to 30 ug/kg/day (> or equal to 3/10 of the recommended human dose) and decreased anogenital distance when given finasteride at > or equal to 3 ug/kg/day (> or equal to 3/100 of the recommended human dose).
This anogenital distance is ordinarily twice as long in male rats as in females.