anthropogeography


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anthropogeography

the scientific study of man’s geographical distribution and his relationship with his environment.
See also: Geography
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It became an obligatory point of passage for discussions on 'native races' and the anthropogeography of the archipelago for another century and more, a path to be traced and retraced.
148-162 (2012), available at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00045608.2012.6962 (quoting Ellen Churchill Semple, Influences of Geographic Environment, on the basis of Ratzel's system of anthropogeography (New York : H.
These concepts had not been employed in the same way before the publication of La Terre et involution humaine, which, as Febvre saw it, set the French school of Geographie humaine, inspired by Paul Vidal de la Blache, apart from the German anthropogeography founded by Friedrich Ratzel.
Kruk's writing is a literary interpretation of the ideas of Karl Schlogel, who within the framework of anthropogeography understands reading and deciphering landscapes as a key to the history of peoples and humankind, for every landscape is simultaneously a cultural and historical text.
Broadly speaking, this rehabilitation of the concept of space was boosted by the colonial globality of high imperialism which resulted in the invention of new spatially oriented academic disciplines such as anthropogeography and geopolitics as well as new transnational concepts such as Lebensraum ('living space').
The concept of community in the last decades has become a favorite topic of research for sociologists, geographers (anthropogeography) or anthropologists.
Speth, W., How it came to be: Carl Sauer, Franz Boas and the Meanings of Anthropogeography, Ephemera Press, Washington, 1999.
In 1898, he led an expedition of seven young scholars and practitioners from different disciplines to the Torres Strait, a group of islands sandwiched between Australia and New Guinea, on "a multidisciplinary project encompassing anthropology in its broadest sense, including ethnology, physical anthropology, psychology, linguistics, sociology, ethnomusicology and anthropogeography" (Herle and Rouse 1998: 2-3).