anti-apartheid

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anti-apartheid

adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to apartheid: the anti-apartheid movement.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

anti-apartheid

[ˈæntɪəˈpɑːteɪt] ADJanti-apartheid
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Charter became the manifesto of the anti-apartheid movement, calling for universal adult suffrage as well as several broadly socialist measures, such as the nationalization of major industries and the redistribution of land.
A series of events marking seven years of majority rule in South Africa, and also to thank the British people for their support for the anti-Apartheid Movement, kicked off in London on 28 April with a spectacular concert in Trafalgar Square, attended by former President Nelson Mandela, the British prime minister Tony Blair, ambassadors, and other dignitaries from Africa and the UK.
Former apartheid hit squad leader Eugene de Kock says Botha ordered attacks on the anti-apartheid movement during the former strongman's trial for contempt for refusing to testify before the truth probe.
It is therefore not too soon for the anti-apartheid movement to begin to examine the economic issues likely to be raised by a liberated South Africa.
It, therefore, welcomes membership from all political factions but views itself as a broad-based Palestinian civil society movement whose raison d'etre is to isolate the state of Israel in the manner of the Anti-Apartheid Movement against Apartheid South Africa.
Singling out the anti-apartheid movement for praise, he thanked those who had picketed South Africa House, the South African High Commission in London during the apartheid years and those who had supported a "long haired" Mr Hain in his battle to boycott South African sport in the 1970s.
HAVING been an Anti-Apartheid Movement activist while at Leeds University in the 1980s I was lucky enough to land a full time job working for the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) at its headquarters in Mandela Street in Camden, London.
As I stood there yesterday, proud to be representing the Labour Party, I also remembered those who were part of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement.
He will be remembered with particular warmth in Scotland and Glasgow, which spearheaded the UK anti-apartheid movement.
The return of the 95-year-old leader of the anti-apartheid movement to his home in Johannesburg allows his family to share time with him in a more intimate setting.
The killing shook the very foundations of the surging anti-apartheid movement, leading to many calls from blacks and others for retaliation and even a race war (which, of course, was exactly what the killers wanted).