Comintern

(redirected from Anti-Comintern Pact)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Anti-Comintern Pact: Rome-Berlin Axis

Com·in·tern

 (kŏm′ĭn-tûrn′)
n.
An association of Communist parties of the world, established in 1919 by Lenin and dissolved in 1943.

[Russian komintern, abbreviation of Kommunisticheskiĭ Internatsional, Communist International.]

Comintern

(ˈkɒmɪnˌtɜːn) or

Komintern

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) short for Communist International: an international Communist organization founded by Lenin in Moscow in 1919 and dissolved in 1943; it degenerated under Stalin into an instrument of Soviet politics. Also called: Third International

Third′ Interna′tional


n.
an ultraradical organization (1919–43) formed to unite Communist groups of various countries. Also called Comintern.

Comintern

1919–43, an international Communist organization to promote revolutionary Marxism, also called Communist International and Third International. It was founded by Lenin and used by Stalin as a political instrument.
Translations

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪntɜːn] N ABBR (Pol) =Communist InternationalComintern f

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪntɜːrn] nKomintern m

Comintern

[ˈkɒmɪnˌtɜːn] nKOMINTERN m
References in periodicals archive ?
Nazi Germany and Japan signed the Anti-Comintern Pact to guard their interests in the case of a Soviet Union attack.
But the road to an agreement with Nazi Germany encountered numerous obstacles, ranging from the Spanish Civil War to the signing of a German-Japanese Anti-Comintern Pact in 1936.
In 1938, shortly before the end of the Spanish Civil War, Spain joined the Anti-Comintern Pact between Germany and Japan.
Although Franco had declared Spain's neutrality, it was in fact a "non-belligerent" state, highly sympathetic to Germany, signatory to the Anti-Comintern Pact and secret protocols on entering the war with Hitler and Benito Mussolini.
In November 1936, the Third Reich initiated the Anti-Comintern Pact with Japan, and the anti-Bolshevik campaign was used to legitimize the internal terror against Jewish citizens.
Buchanan then blames the Poles for not joining Germany's Anti-Comintern Pact, which would have developed into a two-pronged attack on the Soviet Union with the Germans, Poles, and Hungarians attacking from the west and the Japanese from the east.
WHEN did Germany sign the Anti-Comintern Pact with Japan?