anti-Soviet

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anti-Soviet

adj
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to anything characteristic of or relating to the former Soviet Union and its government: anti-Soviet propaganda.
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to the government and policies of the former Soviet Union: they are not pro-Nazi but anti-Soviet.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, anti Americanism and anti-Sovietism seemed inevitable in the former Japanese colony, for its state of division was caused by these two hegemons that represented, respectively, the capitalist sphere and the socialist bloc.
However, if Ceausescu had expressed solidarity with the Prague Spring, it was through anti-sovietism rather than any shared critique of stalinism.
The connection he describes between anti-Sovietism and antisemitism was reinforced by the occupiers' general policy of recruiting among those who had been repressed earlier, such as former kulaks or those affected by the Great Terror, to which were added "racial" criteria that interacted with the results of Soviet nationalities policy.
During the Cold War they provided a populist base for anti-Sovietism in France, and they defended French colonialism in Algeria and Indochina to the bitter end.
Bush II receives a scathing "F" for his "catastrophic leadership" animated by a neoconservative Manichaeism (anti-Islamism replacing anti-Sovietism) and a missionary zeal that bred simpleminded dogmatism and destructive unilateralism.
Mr Pavlovsky: "David absorbed anti-Sovietism, as the saying goes, with his mother's milk."
As with Peter Fraser before him and Keith Holyoake, John Marshall and Rob Muldoon afterwards, there was a tactical as well as purely ideological motivation to Holland's anti-Sovietism. He saw advantage in vigorously attacking the Soviet Union, particularly when it committed one of its periodic outrages, as in Hungary in 1956.
Any literate person of Kristol's generation surely remembers the repressive charges of "anti-Sovietism" leveled by the pre-Gorbachev Kremlin against domestic dissidents, including the great pro-democracy (and, yes, pro-peace) dissident Andrei Sakharov.
And here is the author, writing admiringly of his father's refusal to become "a paladin of anti-Sovietism" after the publication of Doctor Zhivago: The tragic thing about the history of Communism is that being anti-Soviet always means being anti-communist and you really could not be a Communist and go against the October Revolution, the echo of which was still too enormous.
Despite signs of anti-Sovietism in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland, the CIA--in May 1988--saw no "unraveling of Moscow's East European empire" and no "diminished military threat posed by the Warsaw Pact." The "Berlin Wall will stay," according to an estimate issued the year before the wall's collapse, "whatever tactical advantages Gorbachev might see in its removal." And the agency went on to predict that, if necessary, Gorbachev would sponsor a "crackdown to preserve Soviet influence." Even after the collapse of every Communist regime in Eastern Europe, the CIA refused to change its assessments of Soviet influence in the region.
Granma praised Churchill for "leaving behind his sick anti-Sovietism to see in time that the USSR was the only ally capable of avoiding total debacle for England in the Second World War".
Part II analyzes antitotalitarianism in the Supreme Court from World War II through the 1960s, showing how the influence of anti-Nazism and anti-Sovietism contributed to landmark decisions in many fields of constitutional law.