anti-Soviet

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anti-Soviet

adj
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to anything characteristic of or relating to the former Soviet Union and its government: anti-Soviet propaganda.
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to the government and policies of the former Soviet Union: they are not pro-Nazi but anti-Soviet.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, anti Americanism and anti-Sovietism seemed inevitable in the former Japanese colony, for its state of division was caused by these two hegemons that represented, respectively, the capitalist sphere and the socialist bloc.
However, if Ceausescu had expressed solidarity with the Prague Spring, it was through anti-sovietism rather than any shared critique of stalinism.
The connection he describes between anti-Sovietism and antisemitism was reinforced by the occupiers' general policy of recruiting among those who had been repressed earlier, such as former kulaks or those affected by the Great Terror, to which were added "racial" criteria that interacted with the results of Soviet nationalities policy.
During the Cold War they provided a populist base for anti-Sovietism in France, and they defended French colonialism in Algeria and Indochina to the bitter end.
Mr Pavlovsky: "David absorbed anti-Sovietism, as the saying goes, with his mother's milk.
Domestically, and this is in many ways a precursor to the Muldoon era, his anti-Sovietism served to 'keep the faith with National Party supporters, woo the uncommitted' and highlight New Zealand's commitment to the West.
Despite signs of anti-Sovietism in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland, the CIA--in May 1988--saw no "unraveling of Moscow's East European empire" and no "diminished military threat posed by the Warsaw Pact.
Granma praised Churchill for "leaving behind his sick anti-Sovietism to see in time that the USSR was the only ally capable of avoiding total debacle for England in the Second World War".
Part II analyzes antitotalitarianism in the Supreme Court from World War II through the 1960s, showing how the influence of anti-Nazism and anti-Sovietism contributed to landmark decisions in many fields of constitutional law.
The best guarantee against a resurgent anti-Sovietism was for the PCF to become an indispensable part of a broad coalition government.
The results of the interviews contradict Kodin's premise that the entire Harvard Project was inspired by anti-Sovietism, for they challenged the prevalent belief that the USSR was loathed by its citizens and ready to explode.
Concomitant with this was fear of the United States, the main Cold War perpetrator of anti-Sovietism.