anti-Communist

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anti-Communist

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who is opposed to Communism: a staunch anti-Communist.
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to Communism: a big anti-Communist demonstration.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reasons for their service under the swastika were manifold, but ethno- nationalism and anti-communism often played a role.
His early chapters consider the period 1946-67, and discuss such topics as the footprint of American culture and consumerism, anti-communism and nuclear concerns, and a challenge to American economic dominance.
His gripes, as well as his misrepresentations of my arguments about anti-Communism and other matters, arise from this failure of understanding.
Although Zinoman is certainly correct to write that ardent anti-communism marked Albert Sarraut's brand of republicanism (p.
Our irrational, obsessive anti-Communism has led us into too many quagmires to be retained as if it were a mode of scientific thinking.
This is a darker story of censorship, FBI spying, government inquiries, anti-Semitism, anti-communism, the breakup of the integrated production-distribution-exhibition business model, and the overall decline of Hollywood.
In her book on anti-Communism and the development of conservative thought and action after World War II, Colleen Doody agrees with those scholars who see a contested New Deal liberalism and a powerful conservatism before the latter's flowering in the 1970s.
Also included in this issue are articles by Dianne Kirby and Stephanie Roulin which, from their different perspectives, approach the theme of Christian anti-communism, and complete the discussion of the varieties of anti-communism initiated in our last issue.
of Nottingham, England) takes a balanced historical approach that aims to situate Kennedy in his times, particularly in relation to his vehement Cold War anti-communism.
Together, these two historians explore separately how issues of race, class, and gender intersected with anti-communism to heighten a politics of fear and narrow the range of policy choices available to federal officials.
Failing to see the irony, they preferred military dictatorships to civilian democrats, and continued to praise Pakistan for its anti-communism, even after it cemented a close alliance and partnership with Communist China.
But a religious commitment to a free market economy and against a government safety net goes back well beyond this brand of Christian anti-communism activism, which thrived in the 1950s and 60s.