anti-Communist

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anti-Communist

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who is opposed to Communism: a staunch anti-Communist.
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) opposed to Communism: a big anti-Communist demonstration.
References in periodicals archive ?
331), because the symbolic universe of Americanist political culture was as amenable to anti-communism and cultural pluralism as it was to industrial democracy and communalism.
The Catholic Church has a worldwide history of anti-communism and in its Catechism of the Catholic Church, a compilation of Catholic beliefs, holds that it "has rejected the totalitarian and atheistic ideologies associated in modem times with 'communism' or 'socialism.'"
The book serves as a cultural history of anti-communism, especially British anti-communism.
In most tellings, anti-Communism neutered the broad coalitions of the Popular Front.
The diversity and complexity of Christianity as a world religion is matched by the variety in forms of Christian anti-communism. Each changed and adapted as required by historical circumstances, time and place.
This fourth edition integrates more material on religion, with new discussions of religious traditions brought to the colonies from Europe, the history of the Mormons in the West, Indian religious movements of the late 19th century, religion and the anti-communism crusade of the 1950s, and controversy over Islam in recent years.
Gradually, the protests became smaller after being hijacked by groups who saw them as a way of reviving 1990s anti-communism. Protesters started to call for "European values", "morality in politics" and a "genuine break" with the communist past.
The John Birch Society is perhaps best known for its zealous anti-communism and its fanatical support of the infamous Joe McCarthy (whose indiscriminate, unjustified accusations of Communist sympathizing destroyed countless people's careers).
It uses firsthand interviews with many of the people involved in Cuban-American relations of the late 1950s and early 1960s, considering the habits and puzzles of Nixon, who often socialized at Havana casinos with his Cuban friend, and traces the evolution of anti-Communism sentiment in general and American-Cuban relationships in particular.
Lyndon Johnson had justified his policy mainly on its anti-Communism. Rood had .justified his on the hard facts of geography.
This was the era of the Cold War and the civil rights movement, and an era when labour struggled to make gains despite rabid counter-attacks by the bourgeoisie and the state in the name of anti-communism.