aromatase inhibitor

(redirected from Anti-estrogen)
Also found in: Medical.

aromatase inhibitor

n. Abbr. AI
Any of several drugs that affect the levels of steroids in the blood by inhibiting the enzyme aromatase. Aromatase inhibitors are used especially to lower estrogen levels to control the growth or prevent the recurrence of estrogen-sensitive tumors in post-menopausal women with breast cancer.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aromatase inhibitor

n
any of a class of drugs that inhibit the action of aromatase: used in the treatment of breast and ovarian cancer
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
According to studies, DBP has been shown to cause proliferation of breast tumor cells and to make anti-estrogen treatments less effective against tumors.
In other tissue, including vaginal tissue, tamoxifen has been reported to exert an estrogen-like response on vaginal cytology by a mechanism yet to be understood and not expected based upon its an anti-estrogen activity.
The anti-estrogen substance is used in fertility treatments and is employed by men to accelerate testosterone production.
We are concerned about using vaginal estrogen in women who have had aromatase inhibitor (Al) therapy; their estrogen levels are so low that absorbing even a small amount might make a difference in terms of effectiveness of AL For women who need more than lubricants or vaginal moisturizers, particularly those taking anti-estrogen therapy (aromatase therapy), the use of low-dose vaginal hormones may be considered on an individual basis, but should include the oncologist in decision making.
In an analysis of lymph node negative HR+ patients, BCI classified 51.5% of patients across the spectrum of intermediate genomic risk scores and patient age as high risk for late (beyond five years) distant recurrence, indicating a need to continue anti-estrogen treatment to 10 years.
These findings may make these difficult-to-treat-cancers easier to destroy by anti-estrogen therapies.
Compared with 2OH[E.sub.1], which can act as an anti-estrogen, 16alphaOH[E.sub.1] is extremely estrogenic; and in cell culture studies, it caused estrogen-sensitive breast cancer cells to multiply.
Utilization of anti-estrogen intervention inhibits the growth of ovarian carcinoma in vitro and in vivo (10,11).
As the gene product of CYP19, aromatase can act on androstenedione generated from the adrenal cortex of adipose tissues to form estrone and testos terone in ovarian tissues to produce androstenedione, and then transform a part of androstenedione into estrone.15,16 Theoretically, LE may be superior to CC because it has no peripheral anti-estrogen effect.
Although this approach is suggested by the literature to be an effective strategy, currently there are no established guidelines applicable to the use of anti-estrogen receptor drugs or prevention in the clinical setting [1,2].
The sections were rinsed with 1X rinse buffer and then incubated with primary antibody, mouse anti-estrogen receptor monoclonal antibody (1:100, Chemicon International Temecula, Canada) for 24 h at 4 [degrees]C, then with secondary antibody, biotinylated goat anti-mouse IgG for ER (Chemical International, USA) for 10 min.
Estrogen receptor [alpha] (ER[alpha]) is overexpressed in over half of all breast cancers and about 70% of the patients respond to anti-estrogen drugs such as tamoxifen (Ali and Coombes, 2000).