antihumanism

(redirected from Anti-humanist)

antihumanism

(ˌæntɪˈhjuːmənɪzəm)
n
opposition to humanism
References in periodicals archive ?
In the framework of overlaid populist and anti-humanist movements, many of the most baffling events of the past few years start to make sense.
When Arbus's work was mounted a year after her death at New York's Museum of Modern Art, the critic Susan Sontag called it "anti-humanist," showing people who were "pathetic, pitiable, as well as repulsive." That seems to be a misreading.
In this regard, she notes the anti-humanist sentiments of many humanist-trained figures, such as Luther and Macchiavelli.
I maintain that this attitude is widespread and in fact anti-humanist, because humanism includes atheism as its essential core and is vacuous without it.
History attests to the dangers of pursuing one to the detriment of the other, producing anti-humanist results.
Whereas pixelated variants of modernist abstraction risk presuming and preserving an autonomous subject, the split subject of Surrealism is ripe for various post- and anti-humanist takes on technology's effects, embodied here in Pamela Rosenkranz's skin-toned silicone poured into Asics sneakers, the spindly blue golem that emerges from Michael E.
His ostensibly anti-Humanist approach to literature and culture chimes with the recent fashion for supposedly post-humanist forms of thinking.
Buchanan sometimes seems arbitrarily to assume that a writer's hostility to Freud or rejection of his theories ipso facto places him or her as an anti-humanist.
Geroulanos (modern European intellectual history, New York U.) reconstructs the development of this intellectual trend in France during the second quarter of the 20th century, arguing that it should be understood in terms of a synthesis of the interconnected movements of the development of an anti-humanist atheism, the emergence of a negative philosophical anthropology, and the elaboration of critiques of humanism.
Anti-humanist at root, postmodernism was born from the literature of Beckett, who "concluded modernism by waging total war on Western culture" through the philosophy of Schopenhauer, "the anti-Apollonian oracle of old Europe's slow suicide," whose "gnostic aestheticism undoes all humanistic values." With the adoption of Schopenhauer's gnosticism, the iconoclast Beckett sought to dismantle "the Christian cosmos piece by piece." After Beckett, contemporary literary critics imbibed this gnosticism that seeks the destruction of all religious and metaphysical foundations in the name of multiculturalism and antiformalism, with the essence of antiformalism receiving a chapter of protracted analysis in the book.
The book argues that the anti-humanist Eliot had a short humanist period and that the humanist Stevens was perhaps no such thing.