antiparticle

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Related to Anti-particle: antiquark

an·ti·par·ti·cle

 (ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-)
n.
A subatomic particle, such as a positron or antiproton, having the same spin, magnitude of electric charge, magnitude of magnetic moment, mass, and mean lifetime as the particle to which it corresponds, but the opposite sign of charge, opposite direction of magnetic moment, and opposite intrinsic parity.

antiparticle

(ˈæntɪˌpɑːtɪkəl)
n
(Atomic Physics) any of a group of elementary particles that have the same mass and spin as their corresponding particle but have opposite values for all other nonzero quantum numbers. When a particle collides with its antiparticle, mutual annihilation occurs

an•ti•par•ti•cle

(ˈæn tiˌpɑr tɪ kəl, ˈæn taɪ-)

n.
a particle whose properties are identical in magnitude to those of a specific elementary particle but are of opposite sign.
[1930–35]

an·ti·par·ti·cle

(ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-pär′tĭ-kəl)
A particle of antimatter that corresponds to an electron or proton but has an opposite charge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiparticle - a particle that has the same mass as another particle but has opposite values for its other properties; interaction of a particle and its antiparticle results in annihilation and the production of radiant energy
elementary particle, fundamental particle - (physics) a particle that is less complex than an atom; regarded as constituents of all matter
antimatter - matter consisting of elementary particles that are the antiparticles of those making up normal substances
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
That effort is "a search for an extremely rare nuclear decay that could teach us whether the neutrino is its own anti-particle," he said.
But the neutrino, an extremely abundant but almost massless particle, may have the right properties, and may even be its own anti-particle.
Their behaviors are called CPT inversions: Charge inversion changes a particle to an anti-particle by switching the in-waves to out-waves and changing the direction of spin.
Gabrielse, a professor of physics at Harvard University, can talk for hours about quantum cyclotrons, laser spectroscopy, plasma and elementary particles and has written scholarly pieces with titles like "Strongly Magnetized Antihydrogen and Its Field Ionization" and the "Aperture Method to Determine the Density and Geometry of Anti-Particle Plasmas.
The existence of anti-particle as such is not a big problem for anti-dialectical official physics.