antirealism

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antirealism

(ˌæntɪˈrɪəlɪzəm)
n
the denial of an objective reality
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References in periodicals archive ?
They are on deconstruction and art: conversation with Jacques Derrida; between deconstruction and postmodernism: points of intervention: interview with Tetsuji Yamamoto; truth, criticism, and the politics of theory: interview with Anthony Arnove; two cheers for cultural studies: a philosopher's view: interview with Paul Bowman; deconstruction, anti-realism, and philosophy of science: interview with Marianna Papastephanou; and Derrida and Indian thought: prospects for an East/West dialogue: conversation with Alison Scott-Baumann.
It has been suggested that Habermas's anti-realism motivates his intersubjective thesis.
Farther along in the issue comes a trove of varied coverage: There's managing editor Suzy Evans's revealing Q&A with "accidental director" (and on-purpose actor) David Hyde Pierce (page 34); Evans's group encounter with the creators of the Broadway-hound father-daughter musical Fun Home (page 48); and critic Isaac Butler's analysis of the new anti-realism, cleverly couched in realism's trappings (page 38), wherein this month's complete play script, Young Jean Lee's Straight White Men, earns some well-deserved explication.
Let's take, for example, two philosophical perspectives that currently dominate the way we approach and interpret reality--realism and anti-realism.
However, several proposals of mathematical anti-realism make a compelling case against indispensability arguments.
Real Realism' presents a novel, modest response to anti-realism in the philosophy of science, one that is inspired by Galileo's defense of the telescope.
DeLanda and Deleuze's realist approach seeks to break with the anti-realism of much continental philosophy, which has eschewed mind-independent realities.
The psychology of someone who believes in objective chances is compatible with anti-realism.
This "trivializes" anti-realism by rendering it tautological (classically).
In "Revising the Logic of Logical Revisionism," (2) Joseph Salerno argues that anti-realism with respect to truth generates a need to reject traditionally held assumptions regarding the Law of Excluded Middle (henceforth, LEM) and certain assumptions regarding whether all sentences are decidable (capable of either being proven true or proven false, henceforth DEC).
Attfield adopts a well-ordered philosophical approach to a series of important introductory topics including verification, analogical reasoning, realism and anti-realism, and falsification as they relate to the subject of creation.
Churchill's version preserves a stylised anti-realism while ensuring the dialogue has a direct and communicative edge, unlike the stilted awkwardness of many Strindberg adaptations.

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