Antichrist

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an·ti·christ

 (ăn′tĭ-krīst′, ăn′tī-)
n.
1. Antichrist The great enemy of Christ expected by the early Church and historically by many branches of Christianity to rise to power in the last days before the Second Coming.
2. One who actively denies or opposes Christianity.
3. A false Christ.

[Middle English Antecrist, from Old French and from Old English, both from Late Latin Antichrīstus, from Late Greek Antikhrīstos : Greek anti-, anti- + Greek Khrīstos, Christ; see Christ.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Antichrist

(ˈæntɪˌkraɪst)
n
1. (Bible) New Testament the antagonist of Christ, expected by early Christians to appear and reign over the world until overthrown at Christ's Second Coming
2. (Theology) (sometimes not capital) an enemy of Christ or Christianity
ˌAntiˈchristian adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

An•ti•christ

(ˈæn tɪˌkraɪst)

n.
1. a personage or power expected to corrupt the world but be conquered by Christ's Second Coming.
2. (often l.c.)
a. any opponent of or disbeliever in Christ.
b. a false Christ.
[before 1150; Middle English, Old English < Late Latin Antichrīstus < Late Greek Antíchrīstos]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Antichrist - (Christianity) the adversary of Christ (or Christianity) mentioned in the New Testament; the Antichrist will rule the world until overthrown by the Second Coming of Christ
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Antikristus
Antikrist
Antikrist

Antichrist

[ˈæntɪkraɪst] NAnticristo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Antichrist

nAntichrist m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Antichrist

[ˈæntɪˌkraɪst] n the Antichristl'Anticristo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Again and again, of course, he will be found to express himself so clearly that all reference to his other writings may be dispensed with; but where this is not the case, the advice he himself gives is after all the best to be followed here, viz.:--to regard such works as: "Joyful Science", "Beyond Good and Evil", "The Genealogy of Morals", "The Twilight of the Idols", "The Antichrist", "The Will to Power", etc., etc., as the necessary preparation for "Thus Spake Zarathustra".
Ay, and observe--it just occurs to me that the Puritans are furious against Buckingham, and their preachers designate him as the Antichrist."
Bulstrode felt that his mode of talking about Catholic countries, as if there were any truce with Antichrist, illustrated the usual tendency to unsoundness in intellectual men.
Other Biblical scenes, as well, came to be enacted, and, further, there were added stories from Christian tradition, such as that of Antichrist, and, on their particular days, the lives of Christian saints.
'They tell me you expound the prophecies relating to Antichrist,' said he, when we were alone.
Despite the play's temporal immediacy, only two scholars posit connections between it and possible historical referents (the heretical Antichrists of 'nowe'), and both overlook the most prevalent heretics during the play's earliest performance history (and the only heretics actually named in the text), the Lollards.
Is he the second coming of Jesus Christ, or the latest in a series of Antichrists, or something else entirely?
The first scene features an Antichrist who dresses himself in grass clothing in order to lend credence to his false claim of having been raised in the Garden of Eden (II: 321-23), a place linked in the medieval and colonial imagination to the space across the Atlantic.
In 1520, Luther came to believe that he was involved in an apocalyptic struggle against the Antichrist himself: the pope.
As is well known, there is some lack of consistency among the Church Fathers in the way each tried to synthesize the variegated traditions that formed the Christian expectation of the Antichrist. This is no less true when it came to the question of the Antichrist's origins.
Antichrist's verbal and material disruptions reflect Lollardy's two primary concerns --resisting the inherent stability of Latin as the language of scripture and denying the truly resurrected body of Christ in the host.
If cosmic history was filled with the struggle between the forces of God and Antichrist, embodied at present in the Roman Church, then stories of Jews were essential to this Christian history as a reflection and a re-presentation of many of the ambivalences in Reformation theology as it intersected with early modern nation-building.