anticolonialism

anticolonialism

(ˌæntɪkəˈləʊnɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
the opposition to colonialism
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Francophone Quebec's initial response to secularization and modernization was a thinly disguised ethnic nationalism inspired by anticolonialism, and formulated now in terms of language rather than religion and descent.
Salazar (who is the son of the formidable historian Zeus Salazar), recently identified that 'the trouble and the danger is the direction which anticolonialism and antielitism has taken in the Philippines...
Rao begins by noting the ineluctable tension between anticolonialism and a "strong but puzzling sentimental attachment to the English language" (296).
Using the resilience of a bright-eyed, ageing woman as a narrative vehicle, this short story introduces us to the historical figures of Jabru and Nizam, two men identified as 'bandits' by the British, but extolled as heroes by the people for their militant anticolonialism: 'Son, they were dacoits in the eyes of the British...
Yet, the irony is that the American people who live in an era of post-colonialism develop an intimate relationship with the colonialism they suffered rather than a feeling of anticolonialism they boasted, particularly when they obtain the hegemonic power with a belief that they can maintain maximum direct or indirect control over the other nations.
Race against empire: Black Americans and anticolonialism, 1937-1957.
Pearson contends that French politicians and colonial administrators took the potential threat of anticolonialism at the UN very seriously.
The implications of this wholesale reassessment of totalitarianism, with its nuanced account of the intersecting histories and geographies of civil rights, the Cold War, World War II, and anticolonialism, are far-reaching.
Brilliantly refashioning di Benedetto's slim existential novel, narrated by its arrogant eponym with unfailing self-delusion, into a fiercely elliptical and political work--the film's anticolonialism is largely Martel's-- the director once again emphasizes the snares set by the senses.
Frantz Fanon's continued relevance today is easy to document: the writings of the Martinican philosopher, psychiatrist, and social revolutionary continue to be widely anthologized; he is repeatedly referred to as one of the "founding fathers" of postcolonial theory (Edgar and Sedgwick 2002, 69; Gibson 2007, 36; Young 1995, 161); he continues to be cited as an indispensable interlocutor in fields as varied as postcolonial theory, anticolonialism, postmodernism, and psychoanalysis.
Chapter 18 infuses Frantz Fanon and Jurgen Habermas's thoughts in Marcuse, leading to an expanded theory of liberation that attends to anticolonialism and the compatibility between individualization and socialization.