carbamazepine

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car·ba·maz·e·pine

 (kär′bə-măz′ə-pēn′)
n.
An anticonvulsant drug, C15H12N2O, used to treat certain forms of epilepsy and to relieve pain associated with trigeminal neuralgia.

[carbam(oyl) + (benz)azepine, one of its constituents (benz(o)- + az(o)- + ep(oxide) + -ine).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carbamazepine

(ˌkɑːbəˈmæzəˌpiːn)
n
(Pharmacology) an anticonvulsant drug used in the management of epilepsy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

carbamazepine

n carbamazepina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Approximately 70% of seizures could be controlled with the current anticonvulsant drugs. Nevertheless, they cause several side effects, which some patients may find intolerable.
Anticonvulsant drugs - normally used to treat epilepsy - are effective initially but they have unpleasant side effects and may eventually stop working, even in higher and higher doses.
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In subsequent years, this term was changed to 'drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome' when it was understood that these symptoms did not only develop with anticonvulsant drugs, but also with various drugs including allopurinol, minocycline, dapsone and sulphasalazine (3).
Even though symptoms of Batten Disease can be reduced using anticonvulsant drugs, there is no known treatment that can eradicate the disease completely.
Anticonvulsant drugs, including Primidone, can cause vitamin D insufficiency as an adverse drug reaction [8].
The patient was discharged from the neurology department with recommendations specific for epilepsy together with anticonvulsant drugs during antituberculous treatment.
Anticonvulsant drugs and cancer: a cohort study in patients with severe epilepsy.
Alternative options PHN also may respond to treatment with antidepressants such as nortriptyline (Pamelor) and desipramine (Norpramine), and anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentin (Neurontin) and pregabalin (Lyrica).