antigen

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Related to Antigen-presenting cells: perforin, Dendritic cells

an·ti·gen

 (ăn′tĭ-jən) also an·ti·gene (-jēn′)
n.
A molecule that is capable of binding to an antibody or to an antigen receptor on a T cell, especially one that induces an immune response. An antigen is usually a foreign substance, such as a toxin or a component of a virus, bacterium, or parasite.

an′ti·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
an′ti·gen′i·cal·ly adv.
an′ti·ge·nic′i·ty (-jə-nĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

antigen

(ˈæntɪdʒən; -ˌdʒɛn) or

antigene

n
(Biochemistry) a substance that stimulates the production of antibodies
[C20: from anti(body) + -gen]
ˌantiˈgenic adj
ˌantiˈgenically adv

an•ti•gen

(ˈæn tɪ dʒən, -ˌdʒɛn)

n.
1. any substance that can stimulate the production of antibodies and combine specifically with them.
2. any commercial substance that, when injected or absorbed into animal tissues, stimulates the production of antibodies.
3. antigens of a particular type collectively.
[1905–10; anti (body) + -gen]
an`ti•gen′ic, adj.
an`ti•gen′i•cal•ly, adv.
an`ti•ge•nic′i•ty (-dʒəˈnɪs ɪ ti) n.

an·ti·gen

(ăn′tĭ-jən)
A substance that stimulates the production of an antibody when introduced into the body. Antigens include toxins, bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances. See Note at blood type.

antigen

A molecule recognized as foreign by the body’s immune system, causing the release of antibodies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antigen - any substance (as a toxin or enzyme) that stimulates an immune response in the body (especially the production of antibodies)
substance - a particular kind or species of matter with uniform properties; "shigella is one of the most toxic substances known to man"
immunizing agent, immunogen - any substance or organism that provokes an immune response (produces immunity) when introduced into the body
immunology - the branch of medical science that studies the body's immune system
agglutinogen - any substance that acts as an antigen to cause agglutinin production
fetoprotein, foetoprotein - any of several antigens that occur naturally in the fetus and sometimes in adults with cancer
anatoxin, toxoid - a bacterial toxin that has been weakened until it is no longer toxic but is strong enough to induce the formation of antibodies and immunity to the specific disease caused by the toxin; "diphtheria toxoid"
antigenic determinant, epitope, determinant - the site on the surface of an antigen molecule to which an antibody attaches itself
Rh, Rh factor, rhesus factor - a blood group antigen possessed by Rh-positive people; if an Rh-negative person receives a blood transfusion from an Rh-positive person it can result in hemolysis and anemia
Translations
antigen
antigeeni
antigén
antígeno
antigen
antigen

antigen

[ˈæntɪdʒən] Nantígeno m

antigen

[ˈæntɪdʒən] nantigène manti-hero antihero [ˈæntihɪərəʊ] nantihéros m

antigen

nAntigen nt

antigen

[ˈæntɪdʒən] nantigene m

an·ti·gen

n. antígeno, sustancia tóxica que estimula la formación de anticuerpos;
carcinoembriogenic ______ carcinoembriogénico.

antigen

n antígeno; carcinoembryonic — antígeno carcinoembrionario; prostate-specific — (PSA) antígeno prostático específico (APE)
References in periodicals archive ?
'We will start by reprogramming mouse and human tumour cells into antigen-presenting cells in the petri dish.
Thus, in addition to providing an understanding of innate immune cell - T cell interaction in farm animals in more detail, the proposed work will provide a basis for exploiting adjuvant-like properties of glycans themselves resulting from their ability to activate both inflammatory and phagocytic receptors expressed on antigen-presenting cells. Our preliminary data demonstrate that there are substantial differences between the glycan-receptors expressed in different mammalian species, and the ligands that they recognise.
Viral URIs enhance allergic sensitization to respiratory viruses, such as influenza and respiratory syncytial virus, cause cytopathic damage to airway epithelium, promote excessive proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and increase the exposure of allergens and irritants to antigen-presenting cells. Viral infections also may induce the release of epithelial mediators and cytokines that may prop agate eosinophilia.
Once sensitized, epidermal antigen-presenting cells (APCs) called Langerhans cells process the allergen and present it in a complex on the surface of the cell to a CD4+ T cell.
Dendritic cells are considered to be one of the major antigen-presenting cells in the skin.
For an effective immune response, immune cells called antigen-presenting cells direct other immune cells, called T cells, to mount an appropriate inflammatory response to fight microbial invaders.
Class II antigens are found primarily on antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, monocytes, and B-lymphocytes and present extracellular-derived foreign peptides.
Dendritic cells (DCs), bone-marrow-derived leukocytes, are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells due to their ability to capture, process and present these antigens to T lymphocytes, thus regulating the adaptive immune response by activating T lymphocytes as antigen-presenting cells.
DC cells own the function of high uptake, processing and presenting antigen, which are the only antigen-presenting cells (APC) directly activating naive T cells.
Immune responses were initiated through the specific recognition of antigens by lymphocytes, and this progress required stable adhesion of the T cells to the antigen-presenting cells (APCs), efficient antigen presentation, and transduction of signals from the cell surface to the nucleus of T cell.
CTLs are activated ex vivo by exposing naive [CD.sup.+] T cells to antigenic peptide/MHC complexes presented by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) [4].
DCs are critical antigen-presenting cells (APC) which present antigen peptides to T cells to initiate specific antitumor immune response.