antihumanism

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antihumanism

(ˌæntɪˈhjuːmənɪzəm)
n
opposition to humanism
References in periodicals archive ?
Her survey of published articles led her to conclude that "decades of antihumanist one-upmanship have left the profession with a fascination for shaking the value out of what seems human, alive, and whole.
As if it wasn't already abundantly clear, the antihumanist agenda of the Left has been prominently on display recently, at least if you look outside the so-called mainstream media.
The Idylls, by contrast, seems antihumanist in the way it threatens several of humanism's foundational dogmas, and posthumanist in the way it encompasses those dogmas and the means by which they can be threatened.
It is a polemical word: It has to do with his never-ending fight against sense-making systems like hermeneutics and philosophy and pedagogy and psychology--a battle guided by a deeply antihumanist rejection of the tradition of Enlightenment and of hermeneutic interpretation, of discourse systems.
The antihumanist trend in much recent ecocritical writing is subsumed in Al-Koni's vision of a sacred order in which human beings have a place if they live by desert Law.
Abstract: The present article presents the possibility of a dialogical and fruitful relation between philosophy and theology, over and against criticisms of Christian thought that have arisen in some postmodern antihumanist circles.
Within this framework, character joins the ranks of those categories--"sexuality," "literature," "Shakespeare," "the human" (Modernism was not antihumanist enough)--once taken for realities but now understood as "ideologically constructed fiction[s]" and thus relegated to the virtual space between inverted commas.
My own model for productive and illuminating scholarly disagreement, serendipitously enough with some of Fish's works, is the concluding chapter of Richard Strier's The Unrepentant Renaissance (2012), which refutes Milton being a "theologically antihumanist poet" (255).
Zubrin's conclusions, I greatly appreciate his expose of the antihumanist movement and his work toward the exploration and development of space.
whether of the utopian humanist (Eliot, Joyce) or aggressive antihumanist (Lewis, Pound) variety, gave rise in the works of late modernists "to an undertow in which the claims of feeling reassert themselves in negative form" (89).
It is important, too, to be reminded of the historical resources of the Western tradition, in the wake specifically of the Althusserian technocracy and the more general antihumanist, poststructuralist trend of critical theory of the last thirty years.
Timothy Brennan evokes another kind of continuity when he confronts the reader with an ardent critique of postcolonial scholars who have refused to see the complicity of Friedrich Nietzsche's antihumanist writings with central tenets of the colonial project.