antilegomena


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Related to antilegomena: Apocrypha, Homologoumena

antilegomena

(ˌæntɪlɛˈɡɒmɪnə)
pl n
the books of the New Testament which have been excluded from the canon of Scripture
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Within the historical process of canon-formation, some works initially deemed antilegomena (that is, disputed though not entirely rejected as authoritative) were ultimately canonized, some others declared apocryphal, and the rest excluded, though exclusion from the Catholic Canon never in itself meant that such works could not profitably be read by the faithful; it has, however, meant that such works should be read only in certain ways--for education in charity, say, and not for authoritative and "safe" (that is, "saving") doctrine.
Westcott's explanation of the place of Wisdom in this passage of the fragment seems preferable.(19) He compared Eusebius' practice of treating the disputed books of both Testaments (antilegomena) together.
Various New Testament items which are noted as disputed in the fragment also figure in this class of combined Old and New Testament antilegomena. Thus Eusebius names Hebrews and the epistles of Barnabas and Clement - works unmentioned in the fragment - among the disputed books cited in the works of Clement of Alexandria; but he also includes Jude, |the remaining catholic epistles', and the Revelation of Peter, which all appear in the fragment (|the remaining catholic epistles' in part).
The writer of the text in the fragment makes a fresh beginning with catholic epistles, having expanded on the Pauline corpus immediately before, and also notes their general acceptance, knowing that some put them among the antilegomena. After these catholic epistles - Jude and two Johannine epistles - the New Testament list ends and the list of Old and New Testament antilegomena begins.
23, above); but in each case it seems more likely that a separate combined list of Old and New Testament antilegomena is in view, as already suggested.
This estimate agrees with the eminent place of Wisdom as the first of the |outside' books in Athanasius, Epiphanius, Rufinus, and Jerome, and, earlier, as the first in Eusebius's list of those Old and New Testament antilegomena which are quoted by Clement of Alexandria.