antimetabole

antimetabole

(ˌæntɪməˈtæbəlɪ)
n
the repetition of words in reverse order for emphasis
Translations
antimetabola
References in periodicals archive ?
The wonderful power of this antimetabole appears to have clinched the argument for slander.
halves of this antimetabole belie Langdell, and I wish to fix some of
Let us recall that immediately prior to saying that he and his book are consubstantial, he says, "Je n'ay pas plus faict mon livre que mon livre m'a faict." The arrangement of these words forms an antimetabole whereby the elements of Montaigne and his book appear once and then reappear in reverse order, connected each time by the verb faire.
(151) The first of these sentences has a three-step anadiplosis with the final element an antimetabole. The second is not so easy to classify, but obviously terms shadow, flames, blood, and book appear twice, in the same order, the first time spread out between two clauses and the second time in a polysyndeton in the third clause.
In this manner a combination of epanados and antimetabole links the peripety to the opening of the speech.
Indeed, "love awake" (if love itself is sleep) becomes a state of unconscious consciousness, where the speaker is neither fully awake nor fully asleep (further undermining the parallelism established by the antimetabole).
This is what Hercules calls "Times revolving Race" and which the narrator reiterates as "Revolving Time" in a witty antimetabole imitating the circle of time (7: 23; 7: 25).
82) observes, the "antimetabole is a change in strategy; it breaks the rhythm of the amplifying statements as the discourse turns back upon itself." Public debate's antimetabolic power to enact perspective by incongruity can be compared to Isocrates' mash-up strategy in the Antidosis, William S.
ANTIMETABOLE: inverting the order of repeated words (AB:BA) to sharpen their sense or to contrast the ideas they convey or both.
Surprisingly, at the conclusion of this chapter and at several other moments in the book, Hadfield's analysis turns away from historical data in order to make space for a formal reading of rhetorical figures (in the Tetralogy chapter, he treats anaphora and antimetabole).
Readers interested in obscure terminology--for example, anadiplosis, antimetabole, furstenspeigl, governmentality, ideologeme, rhizomatic, uchronic--will learn much new vocabulary.
For each of the texts subjected to minute examination (a small selection of Pembroke's Psalmes, Wroth's 'A Crowne of Sonnets' from Pamphilia to Amphilanthus, and a few stanzas from Lanyer's Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum), she makes a very strong case for the presence of such rhetorical tropes as 'ploce' (repetition), 'parison' (balance), and 'antimetabole'.