antimetabole

antimetabole

(ˌæntɪməˈtæbəlɪ)
n
the repetition of words in reverse order for emphasis
Translations
antimetabola
References in periodicals archive ?
halves of this antimetabole belie Langdell, and I wish to fix some of
The first of these sentences has a three-step anadiplosis with the final element an antimetabole.
In this manner a combination of epanados and antimetabole links the peripety to the opening of the speech.
claims that the final scene illustrates the harmony of the neo-Platonic principle of discordia concors, especially as it is realized by the rhetorical trope antimetabole, with its mirror-like symmetry (2003,156-71).
This is what Hercules calls "Times revolving Race" and which the narrator reiterates as "Revolving Time" in a witty antimetabole imitating the circle of time (7: 23; 7: 25).
Like its twin sister chiasmos, antimetabole can be used to suggest ironic reversal; it challenges and, therefore, compels us to reconsider causal relationships:
Readers interested in obscure terminology--for example, anadiplosis, antimetabole, furstenspeigl, governmentality, ideologeme, rhizomatic, uchronic--will learn much new vocabulary.
Once that boundary is recrossed in the aftermath of the fairy-nocturnal episodes, Shakespeare unfolds the total chiasmus or antimetabole at play in the famous speech of Theseus.
Con una antimetabole si puo concludere che se Agostino interiorizza la retorica, Ignazio al contrario retoricizza o teatralizza l'interiorita con il metterle a disposizione una griglia narrativa e drammatica entro cui adagiare le manifestazioni spirituali dell'io" (Battistini 34).
A wizard at maneuvering the tropes and figures of the medieval schoolboy's rhetoric, she makes use of many kinds of asymmetry, including aposiopesis ("a sudden breaking off of a thought in the middle of a sentence as though the speaker were unable or unwilling to continue"), antimetabole ("turning about"), asteismus ("refined, witty talk"), on through the alphabet of word and sound plays, including arrangement on the page.
The usage of antimetabole ("inverting the order of repeated words [ABBA] to sharpen their sense or to contrast the ideas they convey, or both.
The rhetorical liberty taken with the scriptures, whereby Christ's figure of parison (repetition in parallel) is turned into an antimetabole (repetition in inverse order), appears characteristically Miltonic.