antimilitarism


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antimilitarism

(ˌæntɪˈmɪlɪtərɪzəm)
n
the opposition to militarism or to war between states

antimilitarism

the quality of being opposed to the establishment or maintenance of a governmental military force. — antimilitarist, n.antimilitaristic, adj.
See also: Politics
Translations

antimilitarism

[ˌæntɪˈmɪlɪtərɪzm] nantimilitarismo
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
But his antimilitarism was of a peculiar and Gallic sort.
She notes that women journalists and political activists voiced their antimilitarism publically and forcefully, and, in fact, calls their involvement "il protagonismo delle donne nella scena culturale e politica" (25).
First, his Quaker antimilitarism, hardened by the horror he witnessed during World War I, caused him to detest "the direct of indirect fostering of the belief that war is ennobling to a nation, .
Prantl and Nakano are correct that the Japanese have a stronger commitment to "human security," (26) than to R2P per se, and they rightly link this preference for human security to the Japanese commitment to antimilitarism.
It should be fairly big and will hopefully include all sorts of highprofile names from the world of antimilitarism.
The newly emerging norm of antimilitarism was predicated largely on a fear of constraints on recently acquired civil and political liberties.
In so doing, New Profile has triggered unprecedented public discussions about the interplay of gender and politics, suggesting that a true commitment to peace must be rooted in antimilitarism and outlining a strategy to move in that direction (Sharoni, 2002).
After presenting this argument not just in "Heaven's Intention III," but in the three essays devoted directly to antimilitarism, "Condemning Offensive Warfare I, II, III"--essays that are familiar to modern antiwar liberals and national-interest realists alike--Mozi goes on to claim that war, like other exercises in state excess, impose significant opportunity costs on society:
s campaign provided a grassroots focus for Mennonite, Brethren, Quaker, Catholic, and other activists promoting peace education and antimilitarism.
The legacy includes isolationist sentiment, antimilitarism, foreign aid coming under fire, controversy over war powers, cracks in the US alliance system, decreased conventional deterrent powers, and the spread of subversive insurgencies.
The United States was wedded to isolationism and antimilitarism, with narrow domestic political interests that shaped its foreign and defense policies.