antimilitarist


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antimilitarist

(ˌæntɪˈmɪlɪtərɪst)
adj
opposed to militarism
n
a person opposed to militarism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Written by the socialist and conscientious objector John Smith Clarke, the Story of Robert Burns described the bard as an 'antimilitarist', an 'internationalist rebel' and 'a worthy proletarian personality to be rescued from the hands of the philistine'.
His defence told the court that as a pacifist he is against war and violence and that his antimilitarist ideas are in conflict with the notion of army service.
This complexity, or duality, is likewise present within the general antimilitarist perception in Japan, which apparently never was a completely "pacifist security identity," as it maintained a role for an army in the post-war and led Japan to join a military alliance (Oros 2017, 56).
The third group of videos documents and displays a variety of antimilitarist, antiracist, and antifascist actions, such as protests, marches and performances made by WiB or in cooperation with local and regional activists (like, for example, Labris--an organization for lesbian human rights--, or the Women's Roma Network).
(The ranks during the first few decades of communism in Sweden were strikingly devoid of intellectuals.) The intensity of antimilitarist feeling grew with the outbreak of war, and in 1914 two motions were put to the SAP congress to clarify the relationship between the mother party and its youth league.
The rise of powerful antimilitarist feelings after the world wars deeply eroded the idea of duty to the nation, even while "the language of rights now dominates political debate in the United States." The post-Vietnam shift to an all-volunteer force further diminished the sense of individual obligation to the whole, while military service often came to be seen as being only for those with no better prospects.
In short, they state, "the military simply will not be able to operate without utilizing women." (25) Thus, despite their antimilitarist stance, NOW'S argument for women's equality aligned with the neoliberal logic restructuring the US military, and, by extension, supported the deployment of US servicewomen to wars throughout the remainder of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first century.
So there is little reason to think a party rooted in organized labor would have been consistently antimilitarist. It would also have been weak in the South, where unions were rare and farmers were not isolationists.
It was suppressed in September 1887 when '[o]ur "boy", 'Le Revolte', prosecuted for antimilitarist propaganda, was compelled to changes its title-page and now appeared under a feminine name', (31) La Revolte (Revolt).
The period between 1911 and 1918 encompasses a number of events, movements and political attitudes that often worked at cross purposes and which all had a stake in defining the role of the mothers of Italy: the Italian campaign in Libya, the emergence of an organized antimilitarist movement that included socialists and anarchists, the continuing "battle of the sexes" and the women's movement, Nationalism and pronatalism, and Italy's intervention in World War I.
'Madam' is herself a pronounced antimilitarist, and it is because she wants to kill war that she is whole-heartedly in support of this war, believing all must strive to the bitter end to crush out the barbarism of Germany.