republicanism

(redirected from Antimonarchism)
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re·pub·li·can

 (rĭ-pŭb′lĭ-kən)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a republic.
2. Favoring a republic as the best form of government.
3. Republican Of, relating to, characteristic of, or belonging to the Republican Party of the United States.
n.
1. One who favors a republic as the best form of government.
2. Republican A member of the Republican Party of the United States.

re·pub′li·can·ism n.

republicanism

(rɪˈpʌblɪkəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the principles or theory of republican government
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) support for a republic
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (often capital) support for a Republican Party or for the Irish Republican Army

re•pub•li•can•ism

(rɪˈpʌb lɪ kəˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. republican government.
2. republican principles or adherence to them.
3. (cap.) the principles or policy of the Republican Party.
[1680–90]

republicanism

the principles of a theory of government in which the supreme power rests in the body of citizens entitled to vote and exercised by representatives they elect directly or indirectly and by an elected or nominated president.
See also: Government
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.republicanism - the political orientation of those who hold that a republic is the best form of government
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Translations
republikánství
Republikanismus
republikanizam

republicanism

[rɪˈpʌblɪkənɪzəm] Nrepublicanismo m

Republicanism

[rɪˈpʌblɪkənɪzəm] n (in US) [Republican Party] → républicanisme m

republicanism

[rɪˈpʌblɪkənɪzəm] nrépublicanisme mRepublican Party n (in US)parti m républicainRepublic of Ireland n
the Republic of Ireland → la République d'Irlande

republicanism

nRepublikanismus m

republicanism

[rɪˈpʌblɪkəˌnɪzm] nrepubblicanesimo
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the salon was a fairly protected space for mutual inquiry, some ideas, including atheism and antimonarchism, were sufficiently radical that those in attendance needed to be careful about what they said.