Antiochus


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Related to Antiochus: Antiochus II, Antiochus III the Great

An·ti·o·chus

 (ăn-tī′ə-kəs)
A Seleucid dynasty ruling in Syria (280-64 bc). Its most important member was Antiochus III, known as "the Great" (242-187, ruled 223-187), who conquered much of Asia Minor but was defeated by the Romans in 190.

An•ti•o•chus

(ænˈtaɪ ə kəs)
n.
1. Antiochus III, ( “the Great” ) 241?–187 B.C., king of Syria 223–187.
2. Antiochus IV, (Antiochus Epiphanes) died 164? B.C., king of Syria 175–164?.
References in classic literature ?
ANTIOCHUS EPIPHANES is very generally looked upon as the Gog of the prophet Ezekiel.
It was built (although about this matter there is some dispute) by Seleucus Nicanor, the first king of the country after Alexander the Great, in memory of his father Antiochus, and became immediately the residence of the Syrian monarchy.
Why, my dear sir, that cameleopard is no other than Antiochus Epiphanes, Antiochus the Illustrious, King of Syria, and the most potent of all the autocrats of the East!
The Achaeans and Aetolians were kept friendly by them, the kingdom of Macedonia was humbled, Antiochus was driven out; yet the merits of the Achaeans and Aetolians never secured for them permission to increase their power, nor did the persuasions of Philip ever induce the Romans to be his friends without first humbling him, nor did the influence of Antiochus make them agree that he should retain any lordship over the country.
Therefore, the Romans, foreseeing troubles, dealt with them at once, and, even to avoid a war, would not let them come to a head, for they knew that war is not to be avoided, but is only to be put off to the advantage of others; moreover they wished to fight with Philip and Antiochus in Greece so as not to have to do it in Italy; they could have avoided both, but this they did not wish; nor did that ever please them which is for ever in the mouths of the wise ones of our time:--Let us enjoy the benefits of the time--but rather the benefits of their own valour and prudence, for time drives everything before it, and is able to bring with it good as well as evil, and evil as well as good.
Again, as Titus Livius noteth, in the case of Antiochus and the AEtolians, There are sometimes great effects, of cross lies; as if a man, that negotiates between two princes, to draw them to join in a war against the third, doth extol the forces of either of them, above measure, the one to the other: and sometimes he that deals between man and man, raiseth his own credit with both, by pretending greater interest than he hath in either.
The sight of the splintered boat seemed to madden him, as the blood of grapes and mulberries cast before Antiochus's elephants in the book of Maccabees.
Judaea now and all the Promised Land, Reduced a province under Roman yoke, Obeys Tiberius, nor is always ruled With temperate sway: oft have they violated The Temple, oft the Law, with foul affronts, Abominations rather, as did once Antiochus. And think'st thou to regain Thy right by sitting still, or thus retiring?
They discuss the urban history of the city, including its archaeology, its administration and extramural residence and industry, the roofing of homes, the architectural context of the Antiochus III inscriptions, religious life, and the city plan; the relationship of the city to its hinterland, including the Lydian countryside, the context of the geopolitical triangle of western Asia Minor, Athens, and Gordion; and key bodies of archaeological evidence.
The other roles also require dramatic and musical prowess: as Antiochus, English baritone Ivan Ludlow, is torn between his love for the queen and his loyalty to the emperor.
the Holy Temple, the principal place of worship for Jews in Israel, was seized by the Syrian-Greek king Antiochus and made into a temple for the Greek god Zeus.
This feast celebrates the dedication of the new altar of the Jerusalem Temple in 165 BC by the Maccabee brothers after the Temple and the altar were desecrated by Seleucid rulers, in particular, Antiochus IV Epiphanes.