Antiochus III


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Related to Antiochus III: Antiochus IV, Cleopatra

Antiochus III

(ænˈtaɪəkəs)
n
(Biography) known as Antiochus the Great. 242–187 bc, king of Syria (223–187), who greatly extended the Seleucid empire but was forced (190) to surrender most of Asia Minor to the Romans
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Antiochus III, or "The Great" as he had legitimate reason to prefer, had extended the reach of his empire from the Aegean in the West as far East as the frontier of modem Afghanistan and into India.
The fact that, in 205BC, King Antiochus III stopped at Tylos on his way to Gerrha, a place in Saudi Arabia, is also considered evidence of the presence of the naval base.
Some tools discovered from the ancient town were limestone, basalt milling and grinding tools used for domestic purposes, wine and oil storage jars and more than 60 coins, including those from the reigns of Hasmonean King Alexander Jannaeus and Seleucid King Antiochus III.
The Coinage of the Eastern Seleucid Mints from Seleucus I to Antiochus III.
by Antiochus III Megas (222-187) it is said: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Letter 37,9) ".
Additionally, the newly emerging symploke of the region and the fact that Egypt, Pergamum, and Rhodes were hot strong enough to challenge the imperial ambitions of Philip V or Antiochus III clarifies why Greeks asked for Roman help.
Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalogue 1: Seleucus I through Antiochus III, New York.
He was the ancestor of a man called Kidin-Ani, a contemporary of the kings Seleucus I and Antiochus I (305-260), who brought back from Elam a tablet containing the rituals to be carried out by the priests, exorcists, professional mourners, singers and theologians in the temples of Uruk, a tablet which Nabopolassar (625-605), the king of Babylon, had stolen some time before, and which a certain Shamash-etir, a member of the same family, and himself the son and grandson of a scribe, had copied during the reign of Antiochus III (222-187).
Antiochus III ruled for thirty-six years, Seleucus I for twenty-four, and Seleucus II and Antiochus II another thirty-five years between them.