Antiochus IV

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Antiochus IV

n
(Biography) ?215–164 bc, Seleucid king of Syria (175–164), who attacked the Jews and provoked the revolt of the Maccabees
References in periodicals archive ?
This feast celebrates the dedication of the new altar of the Jerusalem Temple in 165 BC by the Maccabee brothers after the Temple and the altar were desecrated by Seleucid rulers, in particular, Antiochus IV Epiphanes. Once again, sacrifice could be offered to the Lord.
Among the topics are Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the apocalypse of Enoch, Aum Shinrikyo (Shoko Asahara), cargo cults, feminist eschatology, four horsemen of the apocalypse, Kingdom of God/Kingdom of Heaven, the apocalypse in popular culture, and zombies.
Therein, the ancient author has offered an emotional history of the revolt of the Jews against the Seleucids, whose leader, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, was fiercely intent upon Hellenizing all under his command.
The story, as we all know, is that at the urging of the Tobiads, an assimilationist faction of Hellenist Jews, the Syrian-Greek monarch Antiochus IV Epiphanes invaded Judea and immediately set about abolishing all expressions of Judaism, including the dedication of an altar to Zeus in the Jewish temple in Jerusalem.
Matters came to a head in 168-166 BCE when the Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes issued a series of decrees outlawing the practice of the Jewish faith, defiled the Temple with the "abomination that makes desolate," and installed a permanent military garrison in Jerusalem.
Unlike Thanksgiving, the much older holiday of Hanukkah lasts for eight days and celebrates the successful rebellion of the Maccabees against Antiochus IV Epiphanes. The holiday's theme of lights comes from the story of the candles in the temple that burned for eight days with just a one-day supply.
The negative Jewish reaction to Antiochus IV Epiphanes' cultic innovation in the Jerusalem temple as described in 1 and 2 Maccabees and Daniel is Smith's parade example.
Doran postulates that Antiochus IV Epiphanes' prohibition of circumcision, Sabbath, and dietary laws was based on the premise that ancestral laws must not be followed, not knowing that Judean ethnic mores were rooted in the religious ikkar (principle) of the One God, which seeded the successful Hasmonean rebellion.
It records the exploits of the Maccabean family (later called Hasmoneans) in their revolt against Antiochus IV Epiphanes and his aggressive campaign to Hellenize (24) the land of Israel.
Based on a critical textual analysis of the Book of Daniel, it is hypothesized that it was specifically written as a theological-political tractate addressed to the Judean Hasidim during their persecution by Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Seleucid-Greek occupier of Israel.
It commemorates the Maccabees victory over the Greco-Syrian king Antiochus IV Epiphanes. He had tried to eradicate the Jewish religion, but was defeated in 165 B.C.