antiparticle

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Related to Antiparticles: antimatter

an·ti·par·ti·cle

 (ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-)
n.
A subatomic particle, such as a positron or antiproton, having the same spin, magnitude of electric charge, magnitude of magnetic moment, mass, and mean lifetime as the particle to which it corresponds, but the opposite sign of charge, opposite direction of magnetic moment, and opposite intrinsic parity.

antiparticle

(ˈæntɪˌpɑːtɪkəl)
n
(Atomic Physics) any of a group of elementary particles that have the same mass and spin as their corresponding particle but have opposite values for all other nonzero quantum numbers. When a particle collides with its antiparticle, mutual annihilation occurs

an•ti•par•ti•cle

(ˈæn tiˌpɑr tɪ kəl, ˈæn taɪ-)

n.
a particle whose properties are identical in magnitude to those of a specific elementary particle but are of opposite sign.
[1930–35]

an·ti·par·ti·cle

(ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-pär′tĭ-kəl)
A particle of antimatter that corresponds to an electron or proton but has an opposite charge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiparticle - a particle that has the same mass as another particle but has opposite values for its other properties; interaction of a particle and its antiparticle results in annihilation and the production of radiant energy
elementary particle, fundamental particle - (physics) a particle that is less complex than an atom; regarded as constituents of all matter
antimatter - matter consisting of elementary particles that are the antiparticles of those making up normal substances
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
While antimatter is rare, a huge amount of energy is released when particles collide with antiparticles, which many see as a new form of energy.
mesons, baryons and their antiparticles, which are composed of quarks [16].
TEHRAN (FNA)- Most of the laws of nature treat particles and antiparticles equally, but stars and planets are made of particles, or matter, and not antiparticles, or antimatter.
A blip of electric current at the end of an atom-thick wire has brought physicists one step closer to confirming the existence of Majorana particles, entities that are their own antiparticles.
By using electrons and their antiparticles rather than protons, as the LHC does, physicists hope to gain a different perspective on the underlying physics.
A possible way of realizing this non-locality is to encode qubits into so-called Majorana fermions - quantum particles that are their own antiparticles.
At sufficiently high temperatures, there would be enough energy available to match up electrons and their antiparticles, or positrons, into what are known as electron-positron pairs.
Then there are "secondary colors," or the stranger sub-atomic particles that started to appear in scientists' heads and as unexpected by-products of experiments around WWII: pions, muons, antiparticles, quarks, positrons and other strange particles.
Antimatter is, in some sense, a mirror image of matter, in the sense that antiparticles have the same or exact opposite characteristic of particles.
Antiprotons, the relatively exotic antiparticles of the proton, are difficult to create and were not to be squandered.
At the subatomic level, for example, particles should behave like their alter egos, called antiparticles.
According to superstring theory, to describe the motion of a string we need eleven dimensions, plus antiparticles and a mirror image of particles, called superparticles.