antiparticle

(redirected from Antiparticles)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Antiparticles: antimatter

an·ti·par·ti·cle

 (ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-)
n.
A subatomic particle, such as a positron or antiproton, having the same spin, magnitude of electric charge, magnitude of magnetic moment, mass, and mean lifetime as the particle to which it corresponds, but the opposite sign of charge, opposite direction of magnetic moment, and opposite intrinsic parity.

antiparticle

(ˈæntɪˌpɑːtɪkəl)
n
(Atomic Physics) any of a group of elementary particles that have the same mass and spin as their corresponding particle but have opposite values for all other nonzero quantum numbers. When a particle collides with its antiparticle, mutual annihilation occurs

an•ti•par•ti•cle

(ˈæn tiˌpɑr tɪ kəl, ˈæn taɪ-)

n.
a particle whose properties are identical in magnitude to those of a specific elementary particle but are of opposite sign.
[1930–35]

an·ti·par·ti·cle

(ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-pär′tĭ-kəl)
A particle of antimatter that corresponds to an electron or proton but has an opposite charge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiparticle - a particle that has the same mass as another particle but has opposite values for its other properties; interaction of a particle and its antiparticle results in annihilation and the production of radiant energy
elementary particle, fundamental particle - (physics) a particle that is less complex than an atom; regarded as constituents of all matter
antimatter - matter consisting of elementary particles that are the antiparticles of those making up normal substances
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
However, if the exotic matter threading the inner throat of the wormhole is likened to the specific dispersive material wherein circulates a stream of antiparticles, our model does-not conflict with classical physics restrictions and can be fully applied.
Antimatter is a material composed of antiparticles of regular matter (such as a position for an electron and an antiproton for a proton, which can together form a molecule of antihydrogen), and when the two opposites come into contact, they completely destroy each other, a high-energy burst of gamma rays being the only remnant.
There is so much in this world of antiparticles and dark matter and quantum loops that is fascinating, but alien.
Objective: Majorana fermions were recently discovered in topological superconductors as exotic quasiparticles having the curious property of being their own antiparticles.
Even in a vacuum, experiments show, fluctuating fields produce a background of transient particles and antiparticles.
8, they appear to move faster than light as tachyons and thereby constitute the framework for both annihilation and creation processes, as was so elegantly presented by Richard Feynman; it is the ability of a tachyonic or virtual process occurring between two scattering events, say A and B, that made particles of matter going backward in time with negative energy and faster-than-light going from A to B appear as antiparticles going faster than light with positive energy and forward in time going from B to A.
While antimatter is rare, a huge amount of energy is released when particles collide with antiparticles, which many see as a new form of energy.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Most of the laws of nature treat particles and antiparticles equally, but stars and planets are made of particles, or matter, and not antiparticles, or antimatter.
First predicted by the reclusive Italian physicist Ettore Majorana in 1937, not long before he mysteriously disappeared, they have captivated physicists for decades because they have the unique property of being their own antiparticles, so if two ever meet, they annihilate each other in a flash of energy.
By using electrons and their antiparticles rather than protons, as the LHC does, physicists hope to gain a different perspective on the underlying physics.
Theoretically, dark matter particles act as their own antiparticles, meaning they should annihilate one another to produce a cascade of familiar particles (including electrons and positrons) as well as gamma rays.
At sufficiently high temperatures, there would be enough energy available to match up electrons and their antiparticles, or positrons, into what are known as electron-positron pairs.