antiparticle

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an·ti·par·ti·cle

 (ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-)
n.
A subatomic particle, such as a positron or antiproton, having the same spin, magnitude of electric charge, magnitude of magnetic moment, mass, and mean lifetime as the particle to which it corresponds, but the opposite sign of charge, opposite direction of magnetic moment, and opposite intrinsic parity.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

antiparticle

(ˈæntɪˌpɑːtɪkəl)
n
(Atomic Physics) any of a group of elementary particles that have the same mass and spin as their corresponding particle but have opposite values for all other nonzero quantum numbers. When a particle collides with its antiparticle, mutual annihilation occurs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

an•ti•par•ti•cle

(ˈæn tiˌpɑr tɪ kəl, ˈæn taɪ-)

n.
a particle whose properties are identical in magnitude to those of a specific elementary particle but are of opposite sign.
[1930–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·ti·par·ti·cle

(ăn′tē-pär′tĭ-kəl, ăn′tī-pär′tĭ-kəl)
A particle of antimatter that corresponds to an electron or proton but has an opposite charge.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiparticle - a particle that has the same mass as another particle but has opposite values for its other properties; interaction of a particle and its antiparticle results in annihilation and the production of radiant energy
elementary particle, fundamental particle - (physics) a particle that is less complex than an atom; regarded as constituents of all matter
antimatter - matter consisting of elementary particles that are the antiparticles of those making up normal substances
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The more energy the LHC produces, the more massive are the particles -- and antiparticles -- formed during collision.
On the other hand, the paucity of antiparticles, mostly produced by secondary interactions of CRs, could in principle drastically improve the signal-to-noise ratio in favor of a putative DM detection, within a rather low expected astrophysical background; this possibility of detecting Early Universe relics by studying galactic antiparticles was first outlined in the early 1980s in several pioneering papers (e.g., [12, 13]) and has been studied in much larger detail in particular during the last decade, mainly thanks to the dramatic improvement in the quality of the data provided by PAMELA [14] and AMS-02 [15] experiments.
The annihilation-like variables of the particles and antiparticles are chosen to be
Particles (together with their corresponding antiparticles, in pairs) can be created out of the vacuum by putting the right amount of energy into the vacuum, thereby giving a virtual particle (-antiparticle pair) enough energy to emerge from the vacuum; similarly, particles (together with their corresponding antiparticles, in pairs) can go back into the vacuum, emitting the excess energy.
However, if the exotic matter threading the inner throat of the wormhole is likened to the specific dispersive material wherein circulates a stream of antiparticles, our model does-not conflict with classical physics restrictions and can be fully applied.
Antimatter is a material composed of antiparticles of regular matter (such as a position for an electron and an antiproton for a proton, which can together form a molecule of antihydrogen), and when the two opposites come into contact, they completely destroy each other, a high-energy burst of gamma rays being the only remnant.
But the concepts - however clearly explained - rest on other concepts, understanding of which is sometimes assumed, and the abstractions mount up - 'The constant that emerged from Newton's work on gravity, G, is not a measurement of anything - it is simply a consequence of the pattern of the observed effects of gravity.' There is so much in this world of antiparticles and dark matter and quantum loops that is fascinating, but alien.
Even in a vacuum, experiments show, fluctuating fields produce a background of transient particles and antiparticles. Does a space pulsating with gravitational waves and bubbling with particles really qualify as empty?
While antimatter is rare, a huge amount of energy is released when particles collide with antiparticles, which many see as a new form of energy.