phagocytosis

(redirected from Antiphagocytic)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

phag·o·cy·to·sis

 (făg′ə-sī-tō′sĭs)
n.
The engulfing and destruction of particulate matter, such as a bacterium, by a cell.

phag′o·cy·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

phagocytosis

(ˌfæɡəsaɪˈtəʊsɪs) or

phagocytism

n
(Physiology) the process by which a cell, such as a white blood cell, ingests microorganisms, other cells, and foreign particles

phag•o•cy•to•sis

(ˌfæg ə saɪˈtoʊ sɪs)

n.
the ingestion by a cell of a microorganism, cell particle, or other matter surrounded and engulfed by the cell. Compare endocytosis.
[1890–95]
phag`o•cy•tot′ic (-ˈtɒt ɪk) adj.

phagocytosis

the action of phagocytes in ingesting and destroying cells.
See also: Blood and Blood Vessels, Cells

phagocytosis

1. A process of a cell actively engulfing other cells or food particles.
2. A process by which certain cells engulf and destroy foreign particles or microorganisms such as bacteria.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phagocytosis - process in which phagocytes engulf and digest microorganisms and cellular debris; an important defense against infection
bodily function, bodily process, body process, activity - an organic process that takes place in the body; "respiratory activity"
Translations

phag·o·cy·to·sis

n. fagocitosis, proceso de ingestión y digestión realizado por fagocitos.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of capsular and lipopolysaccharides increases pathogenicity and antiphagocytic qualities suitable for evading the human immune system and can provide genetic diversity for increased multidrug-resistant populations (Arora, Devi, Chadha, & Malhotra, 2009).
This antiphagocytic phenotype which constitute the majority of these bacterium can reside within the mucosa or with the epithelium (5-8), macrophages (9), and dendritic cells (DCs) (10).
However, cancer cells often express CD47 and other antiphagocytic (protective) signals that protect them from PrCR-mediated recognition and phagocytosis.
Antiphagocytic factor (Fibrinolysin), hemolysins, and coagulase are important virulence factors also reported in pathogenic bacteria [46, 47].
Tumors evade macrophage phagocytosis through the expression of antiphagocytic signals within the tumor microenvironment.
simulans (i.e., slime layer or biofilm) have an antiphagocytic effect on human polymorphonuclear leucocytes as compared to unencapsulated forms of the pathogen [8].
Virulence profile analysis of SDSE revealed that its genetic basis of disease propensity is shared with GAS, including the antiphagocytic M protein, streptolysin O, streptolysin S, streptokinase, and one or more pyrogenic exotoxins [6].