Antoninus


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Antoninus

(ˌæntəˈnaɪnəs)
n
(Biography) See Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

An•to•ni•nus

(ˌæn təˈnaɪ nəs)

n.
Marcus Aurelius, Marcus Aurelius.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Antoninus - Emperor of RomeAntoninus - Emperor of Rome; nephew and son-in-law and adoptive son of Antonius Pius; Stoic philosopher; the decline of the Roman Empire began under Marcus Aurelius (121-180)
References in classic literature ?
It seems to me sufficient to take all those emperors who succeeded to the empire from Marcus the philosopher down to Maximinus; they were Marcus and his son Commodus, Pertinax, Julian, Severus and his son Antoninus Caracalla, Macrinus, Heliogabalus, Alexander, and Maximinus.
Turning now to the opposite characters of Commodus, Severus, Antoninus Caracalla, and Maximinus, you will find them all cruel and rapacious-- men who, to satisfy their soldiers, did not hesitate to commit every kind of iniquity against the people; and all, except Severus, came to a bad end; but in Severus there was so much valour that, keeping the soldiers friendly, although the people were oppressed by him, he reigned successfully; for his valour made him so much admired in the sight of the soldiers and people that the latter were kept in a way astonished and awed and the former respectful and satisfied.
But his son Antoninus was a most eminent man, and had very excellent qualities, which made him admirable in the sight of the people and acceptable to the soldiers, for he was a warlike man, most enduring of fatigue, a despiser of all delicate food and other luxuries, which caused him to be beloved by the armies.
Thus a Trajan and an Antoninus, a Nero and a Caligula, have all met with the belief of posterity; and no one doubts but that men so very good, and so very bad, were once the masters of mankind.
Antoninus be ascribed to Nero, or should the worst incidents of Nero's life be imputed to Antoninus, what would be more shocking to belief than either instance?
He became a Christian and wrote a defence of the Christians addressed to Antoninus Pius.
Then, Mr Wegg, in a dry unflinching way, entered on his task; going straight across country at everything that came before him; taking all the hard words, biographical and geographical; getting rather shaken by Hadrian, Trajan, and the Antonines; stumbling at Polybius (pronounced Polly Beeious, and supposed by Mr Boffin to be a Roman virgin, and by Mrs Boffin to be responsible for that necessity of dropping it); heavily unseated by Titus Antoninus Pius; up again and galloping smoothly with Augustus; finally, getting over the ground well with Commodus: who, under the appellation of Commodious, was held by Mr Boffin to have been quite unworthy of his English origin, and 'not to have acted up to his name' in his government of the Roman people.
He was to leave the city by the Porta del Popolo, skirt the outer wall, and re-enter by the Porta San Giovanni; thus they would behold the Colosseum without finding their impressions dulled by first looking on the Capitol, the Forum, the Arch of Septimus Severus, the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina, and the Via Sacra.
The temple dates back to the second century AD, judging by the names found of different Roman emperors including Domitian (81-96 AD), Hadrian (117-138 AD) and Antoninus Pius (138-161 AD).
The central figure in this study is Antonino Pierozzi (Antoninus, in Latin), who was the archbishop of Florence during the mid fifteenth century and who was also the subject of Howard's first book, Beyond the Written Word: Preaching and Theology in the Florence of Archbishop Antoninus, 1427-1459 (Florence, 1995).
St Antoninus Pierozzi (1389-1459), Archbishop of Florence and a celebrated Dominican preacher and theologian, had in fact been developing the concept since the 1420s, through his sermons and in his Summa Theologica (1450).
Antoninus Chapel at San Marco in Florence, then to a study of holy men and women in Florence and Tuscany between c.