Anzac


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Related to Anzac: ANZAC Day

An·zac

 (ăn′zăk′)
n.
A soldier from New Zealand or Australia.

[A(ustralian and) N(ew) Z(ealand) A(rmy) C(orps).]

An′zac′ adj.

Anzac

(ˈænzæk)
n
1. (Military) (in World War I) a soldier serving with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps
2. (Military) (now) any Australian or New Zealand soldier
3. (Historical Terms) the Anzac landing at Gallipoli in 1915

An•zac

(ˈæn zæk)

n.
any soldier from Australia or New Zealand.
[1915]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Anzac - a soldier in the Australian and New Zealand army corps during World War I
soldier - an enlisted man or woman who serves in an army; "the soldiers stood at attention"
Translations

Anzac

[ˈænzæk] n abbr =Australia-New Zealand Army CorpsA.N.Z.A.C. m; (soldier) → soldato dell'A.N.Z.A.C.
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References in periodicals archive ?
NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian and Minister for Veterans Affairs David Elliott announced the 100 significant sites where soil samples will be collected for the artwork, designed by artist Fiona Hall as part of the Centenary of Anzac commemorations.
The biscuits then came out very close to the Anzac biscuits served on the Riverboat Postman.
Meleah Hampton, currently with the Military History Section of the Australian War Memorial (AWM), presents the Battle of the Somme for 1st Anzac Corps.
It gives the reader an insight in what it was like to be an ANZAC soldier.
Addressing the crowds, Alexander Downer, Australian high commissioner to the UK, said: "When we reflect on Anzac Day we imagine the Gallipoli landings, what it must have been like, at dawn on the water, in sight of that rugged shoreline - and a collectively held breath, a leaden silence about to be broken.
Australian High Commissioner Margaret Adamson said the service and sacrifice of Pakistani soldiers who fought shoulder to shoulder with ANZAC soldiers at Gallipoli was a testament to the enduring friendship between Australia and Pakistan.
ANZAC Day, April 25, is a major annual holiday in Australia and New Zealand marking the first major battle involving troops from both countries during World War One at Gallipoli in Turkey.
Anzac Day is a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand that broadly commemorates all Australians and New Zealanders "who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations" and "the contribution and suffering of all those who have served.
In taking up the term 'field', we adhere to the Bourdieusian theme of this Special Issue and take the heritage field to be an area of social life with its own logic or rules, structured in terms of particular issues of 'stake' and power that determine how an 'event' such as Anzac memory is observed, defined and represented.
Prosecutors alleged on Thursday that Besim discussed the planned terror attack with a British accomplice, as well as doing online searches about Anzac Day events.
The 16-year-old from Manchester was detained by anti-terror police in April along with Britain's youngest convicted Islamic terrorist, a boy of 14 from Blackburn, Lancashire, who has already admitted encouraging an IS-inspired terror attack on officers at the annual Anzac parade.
Amid the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign, this is a fitting time to re-examine the film, its intentions and its significance in upholding the Anzac national myth, writes BRIDGET CURRAN.